Explore Bean Mountain on Snowshoes

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Bean Mountain is part of the 1,750-acre Ashuelot River Headwaters project that Forest Society is working to conserve. Courtesy photo.

Want to get outdoors and explore NH’s winter landscape and natural world? Then, join the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests on a rugged, off-trail snowshoe tour of Bean Mountain in Lempster on Saturday, January 24 (weather date Sunday, January 25).

Forest Society Education Director Dave Anderson and Director of Land Conservation Brian Hotz will lead participants on a free, guided recreational snowshoe tour of the lower portion of the Bean Mountain tract. It is part of the Ashuelot River Headwaters conservation project in Lempster.

You’ll be able to explore the spruce and fir forest and wetlands along the Ashuelot River, track winter wildlife and learn about the area’s natural history.

Bean Mountain is part of the 1,750-acre Ashuelot River Headwaters project that Forest Society is working to conserve. Part of a 10,000-acre block of forestland, the area is home to many animals that require large range areas including moose, bear, and bobcat.

Located just south of the conserved lands surrounding Mount Sunapee and adjacent Pillsbury State Park, this dramatic landscape includes more than 11,000 feet of frontage on the Ashuelot River. The forestland and its streams are critical to maintaining clean drinking water supplies for downstream communities.

The outing will begin 9:00 a.m. with a short review of local maps. Participants should bring lunch and snowshoes. Pre-registration is required. Call Tina at the Forest Society, phone 224-9945 ext. 313 for trip details and meeting location.

Founded in 1901, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests is the State’s oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization. It’s mission is to perpetuate the forests of New Hampshire by establishing permanent conservation areas and promoting the wise stewardship of private lands. For more information, visit www.forestsociety.org.

Related Sunapee News Articles

Sunapee Conservationists Protects 16 Acres in Burkehaven

Greenway Leads Ten Winter Hikes

Dick Webb Named Forest Society Conservationist of the Year

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