Native American containers on exhibit in Warner NH

"Gourd Basket Full of Dream"

“Gourd Basket Full of Dream” by Judy Dow

A new exhibit of Native American containers is on display in the contemporary art gallery at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, N.H.

Bark, marsh-plant fiber, ash splint, gourd, cattails – these are  some of the materials that have been skillfully and artfully twined, woven, carved, folded, or sewn into the containers.

“Containers” will focus on connecting the works of art to the plants from which they have been made,  as shown in Judy Dow’s “Gourd Basket Full of Dreams” and Vera Longtoe Sheehan’s “Five-color Twined Bag.”

The exhibit also features works from artists Jeanne Kent, Liz Charlebois, Lina Longtoe, Jennifer Lee, and Julia Marden.

“Containers” will be on display through July 14.

For more information, including hours and admission, visit: www.indianmuseum.org.

Five-Color Twined Bag by Vera Longtoe Sheehan

Five-Color Twined Bag by Vera Longtoe Sheehan

MKIM: Growing and saving heirloom plants

CornStalkWarner, N.H. – Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, 18 Highlawn Road, will present a talk by gardener and preeminent seed saver Anne Miller of the VT and NH Seed Savers Organization on Saturday, March 9, at 1 p.m.

Miller will discuss how to grow Native American heirloom plants and how to save their seeds. Admission to the talk is free; admission to the museum galleries, $5.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum was founded in 1990 by Charles “Bud” and Nancy Thompson as an educational and cultural center to connect visitors with Native American culture, past and present, and to encourage respect for our environment. For more information, go to www.indianmuseum.org.

MKIM: Family Snowshoeing Day Feb. 26

Snowshoe

Warner, N.H. – Weather forecasters predict the Sunapee/Kearsarge area will get a fresh layer of snow this weekend, which is perfect for a snowshoe outing.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, 18 Highlawn Road, will hold a Family Snowshoeing Day on Tuesday, February 27, from 10 a.m. to 12 p.m.  The event is part of Warner’s Family Fun Week.

“Please join us for a free guided family snowshoe hike. Bring your own snowshoes, or borrow a pair from us. We’ll have examples of hand-made wooden snowshoes and materials used in making snowshoes,” says MKIM Executive Director Lynn Clark. “We’ll also have hot chocolate for all! Bring your family. Bring your friends.”

For more information, call MKIM at 603-456-2600 or email: info@indianmuseum.org.

View/download the event calendar for Warner Family Fun Week (February 23 – March 3) HERE (pdf 86KB).

Archaeologist to speak at Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum

Warner, N.H. – Dr. Robert G. Goodby, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, will share his latest research at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum’s Annual Meeting on January 19.  Goodby’s presentation is titled “Tenant Swamp:   A Late Ice Age Site in Keene, NH.”  It will begin at 12:45pm and is open to the public free of charge. Continue reading

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum to hold Winter Celebration

Storyteller Carolyn Hunt of the Laughing Couple with an illustration of her story in the background. Hunt’s husband Rick illustrates stories while Carolyn tells them.

Warner, N.H. -  The Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum will host Native storytellers during a day full of family activities celebrating the start of winter.  The festival will include singing and dancing, crafts, games, traditional Native foods and a sale at the Dream Catcher gift shop.

Winter Celebration is held in the museum Saturday, December 8, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., at 18 Highlawn Road in Warner.  Visitors can stroll through the arboretum, walk the trails in the Medicine Woods, play in the tipi and tour the museum itself, in addition to all the festival activities.  Admission is free for members and $5 for non-members. Continue reading

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum hosts Intertribal Powwow

Takara Matthews is this year’s Head Lady Dancer.

For the first time, the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, N.H., will celebrate its annual intertribal powwow with a drum competition.

MKIM‘s 13th Annual Intertribal Powwow begins on July 14 at 10 a.m.and runs to July 15 at 4 p.m.

Two host drums will supply music for the weekend and other Native American drums are invited to enter the competition.

“Most people don’t realize that the event is about more than competitions. It’s really a way for Native American participants to socialize with one another. Non-native visitors get the chance to learn about new cultures through music, dance, arts, crafts, and food,” says the museum’s Executive Director Lynn Clark.

The museum welcomes the entire community to spend the weekend and enjoy activities for the whole family.

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Admission is $8.50 for adults and $6.50 for children with discounts for families, students, and seniors. Museum members are admitted free. Those who become members at the Powwow will receive free admission as well.

For event and program information, visit www.indianmuseum.org.

Photographs from last year’s powwow by Steven Daigle.

MKIM’s Turtle Island summer camp, openings in July

It’s not too late to register for Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum’s (MKIM’s) Turtle Island Day Camp.

The camp, on MKIM’s 10 acres of fields and forest in Warner, offers boys and girls (ages 6-12) outdoor activities, crafts, games, storytelling, music and art based on Native American culture, all with an environmental awareness component.

The remaining weekly themes are:

  • The Powwow is Coming!
  •  Survival Week
  • Land, Lore, and Animals
  • Weave a Story Web

There are still a few spaces available in all four weeks, but call soon if you want to enroll your child, said Lynn Clark, the museum’s executive director.

Sign up for as many weeks as you want! For more information go to IndianMuseum.org, where you can download a registration form, or call 603-456-2600 x226.

Extended care is available mornings and afternoons. Turtle Island Day Camp is completely accessible and is licensed by the State of New Hampshire.  Financial aid is available, and Turtle Island Day Camp accepts N.H. Childcare Assistance funds.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum was founded in 1990 by Charles “Bud” and Nancy Thompson as an educational and cultural center to connect visitors with Native American culture, past and present, and to encourage respect for our environment.  The Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum seeks to challenge all of us to improve the quality of our lives and our world.  The museum is open daily May 1 – October 31, Monday – Saturday 10-5, Sunday noon-5,  and on weekends in November through mid- December.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum: classes and powwow

Activities & Events at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, New Hampshire

For more information, call the museum at 603-456-2600 or visit www.IndianMuseum.org

  • Sunday, June 24 – Bead Weaving Class with Lynn Murphy at 10 a.m. and Free Beadwork Demonstration, 1-3 p.m. Lynn Murphy, an Abenaki, educator, wife and mother, is a traditional basketmaker and beadworker.
  • Sunday, July 1 – One Needle Applique Beadwork Class with Rhonda Besaw at 10 a.m. and Free Beadwork Demonstration, 1-3 p.m.
  • Saturday, July 14 – 13th Annual Intertribal Powwow 10-5, Grand Entry at noon
  • Sunday, July 15 – 13th Annual Intertribal Powwow 10-4, Grand Entry at noon
  • Sunday, July 29 – Peyote Stitch Beadwork Class with Lynn Murphy 10am and Free Beadwork Demonstration 1-3 p.m.

My ancestors have lived in southern Quebec, Canada and on both sides of the Kwinitekw (Connecticut) River in New Hampshire and Vermont for hundreds of years.  By doing beadwork in the same style and manner as my ancestors, I honor those who have gone before me and give to those in the future. Through beadwork, the reality of Abenaki survival can be shared and acknowledged.  – Rhonda Besaw (from artist’s statement)

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum opens contemporary gallery

On display in MKIM's new gallery: Talon and Horse, Shoshone-Bannock, Idaho -- an archival pigment ink print by photographer Annie Holt of Lyndeborough, N.H. (Photo courtesy of Annie Holt.)

The Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, New Hampshire, opens a new gallery for contemporary art on May 1 with a show of Native American regalia.

Aln8baw8zow8ganal: Splendid Clothes, Splendid Traditions, the gallery’s first exhibit, will feature clothing and accessories as well as paintings and photographs through July 15.

Aln8baw8zow8ganal (al-non-ba-won-zo-won-gan-al) is the Abenaki word for traditionally made clothing; literally translated as Indian clothes.

Making and wearing regalia is a highly visible way of communicating identity and of connecting to tradition; many Native-themed arts revolve around regalia.

Crafted by Andy Bullock, this beaded hood will be on display. It represents the traditional headdress of the Wabanaki people. Andy, a Wampanoag, has beaded for 35 years. (Photo courtesy of Andy Bullock.)

The exhibit of regalia, accessories, paintings and photographs will include work from New England artists: Monica Alexander, Rhonda Besaw, Natalie Holt Breen, Andy Bullock, Chris Bullock, Liz Charlebois, Darryl Peasley, Tammy Bucchino, Annie Holt and Pam Tarbell.

Admission to the gallery is free. (Visit the MKIM website for museum admission prices.)

The Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum serves as an educational and cultural center connecting visitors with Native American culture, past and present, and to encourage  respect for our environment. Nancy Jo Chabot is the museum curator. For more info, visit: www.indianmuseum.org or contact Executive Director Lynn Clark, (603) 456-3244.

Note: The “8″ in “Aln8baw8zow8ganal” represents a unique sound of Abenaki language we do not have in English. It represents a nasalized, unrounded ‘o’.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum: Beading classes start April 29

On April 29, Liz Charlebois, an Abenaki crafts person, artist, and traditional basket maker, will teach a lazy stitch beadwork class at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner.

This is the first of eight classes the museum is offering this season in bead and quillwork techniques taught by Native American artists.

The classes are for adults of all skill levels and will meet on Sunday mornings (starting at 10 a.m.) from April through October. Each class cost $15 for members and $30 for non-members. Sign up for one or more by calling the museum at (603) 456-2600.

Lazy stitch beadwork is one of the most popular types of beadwork used for powwow regalia, but it can be used on just about anything. The stitch was invented in the early 1800s as Native Americans acquired tiny “seed” beads, which they then applied to important items of material culture such as horse saddles, moccasins, bags and clothing.

Liz Charlebois lives in Warner, and has been involved in the New England native community for most of her life. She is a member of the N.H. Commission on Native American Affairs and sits on the Executive Board for Emerging Leaders in Communities of Color.

Bead and quillwork classes offered at MKIM:

  • April 29: Lazy Stitch – Liz Charlebois
  • May 20: Brick Stitch – Rhonda Besaw
  • May 27: Loom Beading – Debbie Dostie
  • June 10: Double Needle Applique – Debbie Dostie
  • June 24: Bead Weaving – Lynn Murphy
  • July 1: One Needle Applique – Rhoda Besaw
  • July 29: Peyote Stitch – Lynn Murphy
  • October 28: Quill Wrapping – Chris Bullock

Demonstrations for the public will follow each class. The program is supported by the New Hampshire State Council on the Arts.

For museum information, visit: www.indianmuseum.org

For a series of published articles about Liz Charlebois, visit www.indianmuseum.org/classes

Photos courtesy of the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum: a blanket strap adorned with lazy stitch beadwork by Andy Bullock and Liz Charlebois dancing at a MKIM powwow.

Read related article:

Indian museum will celebrate start of planting season (Sunapee News)

Indian Museum will celebrate start of planting season

The Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum in Warner, New Hampshire, will hold a children’s reading program on April 25 and will celebrate the start of the planting season with a festival on May 6. (In articles to follow, look for news about MKIM’s contemporary art gallery that opens May 1 and beading classes offered later this month.)

Lisa Tremblay reads her children’s book – April 25

Local author and illustrator Lisa Tremblay will read from her children’s book “How Coyote Created the Milky Way” on Wednesday, April 25, at 11 a.m. This is a free event offered during school vacation week for families to enjoy together. Lisa’s paintings illustrate a classic tale of the trickster coyote.

‘How Coyote Created the Milky Way’ is a children’s book of a Native American folklore that I have re-told and illustrated in watercolor with accents of acrylic to give emphasis to the Coyotes character. It is a visually stimulating and mystical story of not only the creation of the Milky Way but how the Coyote came to be as well.” – Lisa Tremblay

Celebrate the Earth and the start of planting season – May 6

Spring is the time for planting festivals in Native New England, and day of family fun and learning will celebrate the start of planting season at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum on Sunday, May 6, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

Activities will include:

  • Learning about the Abenaki “Language of Gardens” and about Native American agriculture from an archaeological perspective.
  • Taking an Herbal Walk to see plants found on the grounds and in your backyard.
  • Learning about their growth, harvesting, preparation and use.
  • Bead work and flint knapping demonstrations and atlatl throwing.
  • Games and crafts.

Admission is $5 for members with a family maximum of $20 and $8.50 for non-members with a family maximum of $26.  Non-members who choose to become members that day will receive free admission. For more information, visit www.indianmuseum.org.

Turtle Island summer day camp registration opens

Registration is now open for Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum’s (MKIM’s) Turtle Island Day Camp in Warner, N.H.  For boys and girls ages 6 – 12, the camp offers outdoor activities, crafts, games, storytelling, and music and art based on Native American culture… all with an environmental awareness component.  Weekly sessions run June 25 – August 3, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.  Extended care is available mornings and afternoons.  Space is limited to 12 campers each week. For more information visit www.indianmuseum.org or call 603-456-2600 ext. 226.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum was founded in 1990 by Charles “Bud” and Nancy Thompson as an educational and cultural center to connect visitors with Native American culture, past and present, and to encourage respect for our environment.  The museum is open daily May 1 – October 31 and on weekends, November through mid-December.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum offers Home School Day

Home School families are invited to the 3rd annual Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum Home School Day for a day of learning and fun on Tuesday, May 17. Education Coordinator Edie Daigle, MKIM, said activities include guided tours of the museum galleries and the Medicine Woods Trail and a Medicine Woods Scavenger Hunt.

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is a natural resource for home school parents said Daigle.  “If your curriculum includes the study of American Indian history and culture, the relationship between people and their environments, or elements of indigenous art and crafts, then a visit to Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum is the perfect way to enhance your students’ learning.”

The Indian Museum and Cultural and Educational Center is located at 18 Highlawn Road in Warner.

For more info and admission fees, contact MKIM, phone  603-456-2600 or email education@indianmuseum.org.

Hawk Henries in concert at Indian Museum

In Concert… Hawk Henries
Chabunagungamaug Nipmuc Flute Maker and Musician

Friday, January 7, 2011 at 7 PM

Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum, 18 Highlawn Road, Warner, NH

Admission: $5.00. Refreshments will be available for purchase. The program promises to “entertain and educate,” says Shawn Olson, the museum executive direcetor. Proceeds go to support the museum’s operations and programming.  For more info, visit www.indianmuseum.org.

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