Two guided tours of the Hay Estate offered in June

The Fells 013Newbury, N.H. – The Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests and The Fells Historic Estate and Gardens are co-sponsoring two historical walks, called “The Hidden History of the Hay Estate,” on Wednesday, June 4, and Wednesday, June 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Hay Forest Reservation in Newbury.

Both walks will be guided by Dave Anderson, the director of education for the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests.

Participants of the June 4 walk will examine evidence suggesting what the Hay estate was like during the era of Clarence L. Hay. Walkers will stop at the cement cistern that fed water to The Fells, see the ruins of a sugarhouse, visit the Milton Clark/Nathan Baker farm cellar complex – the last and most expensive parcel purchased by statesman John Milton Hay, secretary to Pres. Abe Lincoln — and walk along the “Old Farm Road Trail” to see the Sarah Bartlett cellar-hole. Walking distance is about two miles.

Participants of the June 18 walk will discover how the Hay family and workers on the estate experienced The Fells from evidence and artifacts that are hidden in plain sight. They’ll tour the “Coach Road Trail” (the historic road used by the Hays to access a favorite picnic spot on Sunset Hill); a unique swath of forest that hosted hurricane salvage operations along Lake Sunapee; the ruins of a water pumping shed; and the site of the former swimming dock located south of the mouth of Beech Brook. Walking distance is estimated to be 1.5 miles.

Attendance at Part 2 is not contingent upon attendance at Part 1. The cost is $5 for each walk. These events, which start at The Fells Welcome Kiosk, are supported by grants from the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation’s Wellborn Ecology Fund and the Creekmore and Adele Fath Charitable Foundation.

To register, call 603-763-4789 x3.

Founded in 1901, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests is the state’s oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization. Supported by 10,000 families and businesses, the Forest Society’s mission is to perpetuate the state’s forests by promoting land conservation and sustainable forestry. The organization owns 50,000 conserved acres of land in New Hampshire and holds conservation easements on another 115,000 acres.

 

 

 

 

Q2C: A meeting for NH trail enthusiasts May 2

Quabbin to Cardigan mapAttention, New Hampshire trail enthusiasts.

The Southwest Regional Planning Commission and Monadnock Conservancy will be hosting the last of three meetings of organizations and citizens interested in a possible long-distance hiking “Quabbin-to-Cardigan” trail in western New Hampshire —  from the Massachusetts/New Hampshire border to Mt. Cardigan and beyond to the White Mountains.

When: Wednesday, May 2, 2012, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m

Where: Community Room at Antioch New England, 40 Avon Street, Keene, N.H.

The meeting is a key part of a trail study being managed by the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and the Appalachian Mountain Club, with help from the National Park Service’s Rivers, Trails & Conservation Assistance program.

“The goal of the study is to take a first look at the feasibility of and local interest in a long-distance trail in the region. The study is NOT for creating any new federal or state designation of trails in the area,” according to the release.

At the meeting, people will be able to:

  • view maps of the area
  • speak with others in southwest N.H. about potential trail routes and connections, and
  • get answers to any questions about the trail study.

The information provided at the three meetings will help decide the next steps in the trail study.

Everyone is welcome to attend.

RSVP by contacting Lelia Mellan at NPS, Lelia_Mellen@nps.gov or 802-457-3368 x14, or Mike Gilldesgame, mgildesgame@outdoors.org, by Friday, April 27.

Related article:  How about a Quabbin-to-Cardigan hiking trail? (Sunapee News)

Hiking and camping on Mount Sunapee will honor Welsh legacy

On Saturday, August 27 at Mount Sunapee State Park, the Friends of Mount Sunapee and Herbert Welsh Centennial Celebration Committee are sponsoring a day of outdoor activities to honor Herbert Welsh and 100 years of conservation efforts to protect land that is now part of Mount Sunapee State Park—one of New Hampshire’s iconic mountain parks.

Dave Anderson, director of education for the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests, and Christopher Kane, a conservation biologist who has studied Mount Sunapee’s old growth, will lead a hike to Mount Sunapee’s Lake Solitude, where the group will stop for lunch.

Hikers will be able to learn about the mountain’s natural and cultural history and its old growth forest. Mount Sunapee State Park has the largest known fragment of old growth south of the White Mountains.

Participants will bring a picnic lunch, start from the state park campground at 9 am and return about 2 pm.

To register for the Welsh Centennial Hike to Lake Solitude, visit: welshcentennial827.eventbrite.com

After the hike, participants can further explore the mountain or relax at the state beach on Lake Sunapee. (There is free entrance to the beach area for campers, otherwise there is a nominal state park fee.)

Evening camping activities will start at 5 p.m. and will include music, singing around the campfire and a celebratory cake. Participants will bring own food for the grills–dinner and beverages. Event organizers have reserved several campsites that are available on a first-come basis.

For more information, contact Friends of Mount Sunapee. Email: info@friendsofmountsunapee.org or phone 603-863-0045.

For Centennial activities & updates, visit: friendsofmountsunapee.org.

Photo description: Located along the Sunapee Ridge between the summit and South Peak, at 2,510 feet, is Mount Sunapee’s Lake Solitude.

Learn about dragonflies on this guided walk

Did you know there are more species of dragonfly found in New Hampshire than in the whole state of California?

Land Steward Specialist Carrie Deegan from the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests and Andy Deegan of the Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust will lead an easy, short walk on Thursday, August 11 (rain date Friday, August 12) from 2 to 4 pm on the Forest Society’s Langenau Forest in Wilmot.

Participants will learn how to identify the major families of dragonflies and damselflies while capturing and releasing them in the field. Children are welcome!

Pre-registration is required. For more information or to register, email signup@forestsociety.org or call Tina at 603-224-9945 ext. 313.

Photos courtesy of the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests. Boy with dragonfly by Carrie Deegan. Dragonfly by Andy Deegan.

Founded in 1901, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests is the state’s oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization. Supported by 10,000 families and businesses, the Forest Society’s mission is to perpetuate the state’s forests by promoting land conservation and sustainable forestry. For more information, visit www.forestsociety.org.

The Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust preserves the rural landscape of the Mt. Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee region. For more information, visit www.ausbonsargent.org.

Legacy of man behind Sunapee purchase to be feted – NewsTimes

SUNAPEE, N.H. AP —The Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests owns more than 50,000 acres in 170 locations across the state, and it all began 100 years ago with the purchase of a parcel on Mount Sunapee orchestrated by an unsung crusader named Herbert Welsh. Generations later, those equally passionate about Mount Sunapee are planning a celebration of Welsh and his legacy of saving the mountain from being further gouged by paper companies threatening its old growth forest.

via Legacy of man behind Sunapee purchase to be feted – NewsTimes.

Sunapee Environmentalist/Writer Eliassen is Forest Society Secretary

Midge Eliassen, Sunapee, is now the secretary for the Board of Trustees of the Forest Society.

Eliassen has served on the Board since 2007, and also serves on the organization’s Outreach Committee.

She is active in the Lake Sunapee Protective Association and is currently that group’s newsletter editor and its former president. And she has a long history in the community, having chaired the Sunapee Zoning Board of Appeals and serving as a member of the town’s School Board Committee.

Eliassen has a BA from Smith College and an MS from Columbia University. She is a self-employed writer whose work has appeared in many local, regional, and statewide publications, including Forest Notes and Soo-Nipi magazines.

Other recently elected Forest Society officers include Goffstown resident Carolyn Benthien, who will serve as chair; Stephens Fowler from Hanover as vice chair; and Hancock resident Leonard “Hunt” Dowse as treasurer.

The Protection of New Hampshire Forests is the state’s oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization. .

Black Mountain will be conserved

The Forest Society has confirmed that Black Mountain will be conserved. The organization has raised the $1.2 million needed to acquire the 1,025-acre property located next to Mount Kearsarge in Sutton and Warner.

“Black Mountain is part of one of the largest and most ecologically important forest blocks in New Hampshire south of the White Mountains,” said Forest Society President/Forester Jane Difley. “Only last week we were still $14,000 shy of our goal, but since then we have received a blizzard of donations. This outpouring of support shows that land conservation remains a high priority for people.”

“The support that we received from the Sutton and New London conservation commissions, the Ausbon-Sargent Land Preservation Trust, the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Coalition, and the local snowmobile community has been key to this project’s success,” said Difley. “We are so grateful to everyone who has helped us to conserve this important piece of the Mount Kearsarge landscape.” Continue reading

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