Community bike tune-up and swap held in New London

Geordie Sousa ’13, of Colby-Sawyer College and the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative, was one of the volunteer “mechanics” at the Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap on May 4th.  Together with Professor Harvey Pine and fellow student Doug Foley ’15, they estimate they tuned-up 35 bikes.

Geordie Sousa ’13, of Colby-Sawyer College and the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative, was one of the volunteer “mechanics” at the Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap on May 4th. Together with Professor Harvey Pine and fellow student Doug Foley ’15, they estimate they tuned-up 35 bikes. Courtesy photo.

New London, N.H. – On the New London Town Green on May 4, the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative (KVTI) hosted a successful Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap that may become an annual KVTI event.

The bike tune-up and exchange was made possible through partnerships and support from Colby-Sawyer College, the New London Police Department, Pizza Chef, Hole in the Fence Café, Arctic Dreams and Village Sports.

On a sunny Saturday afternoon KVTI members distributed coupons contributed by Arctic Dreams, Hole in the Fence Café and Pizza Chef to the 20 community members who donated bikes.  Those members also facilitated 12 swaps for people who brought in smaller bikes and “traded-up” for a larger size, and eight other people went home with a “new” bike.

In addition, three volunteer mechanics were on hand to offer free tune-ups and advice. Professor Harvey Pine from Colby-Sawyer College and students Geordie Sousa ’13 and Doug Foley ’15 worked on approximately 35 bicycles throughout the day.

Two New London Police Department officers, Patrolman Eben Lamson and Detective Tom Anderson, distributed free helmets, and John Kiernan from Village Sports sized the helmets and was on-hand to provided additional technical assistance and equipment as needed.

Candis Whitney from the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative welcomes participants to the Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap as they enter the donation area on the New London Town Green. Over 20 bicycles were donated on the May 4 event.

Live music was provided by Ben Dobrowski, co-owner of Greenhill Collective Farm in Sutton, N.H.

Bikes that were not claimed by the end of the day were donated to local children and to Colby-Sawyer’s Chargers Stable, a free bike-share program for students.

The Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative encourages the nine towns in the Kearsarge Valley to develop a greater reliance on local resources – food, energy and human resources in particular – to address the impacts of global issues such as economic insecurity, environmental instabilities, and dependence on non-renewable energy.  Its members include Colby-Sawyer College students, faculty and staff, as well as residents from surrounding communities.

For more information visit the KVTI blog or www.meetup.com/transition-Kearsarge.

 

An invite to Kearsarge Valley Going Local

Tina Clarke

Transition Trainer Tina Clarke will be the guest speaker at Kearsarge Valley Going Local, a community-wide gathering to be held on the campus of Colby-Sawyer College, New London, on Saturday, March 30, from noon to 5 p.m. The public is invited to attend.

New London, N.H. — A community-wide gathering to build self-reliance and resilience, while promoting sustainability and enhancing quality of life in the Kearsarge Valley Region, will be hosted in the Ware Campus/Student Center on the Colby-Sawyer College campus in New London on Saturday, March 30, from noon to 5 p.m.

The event—Kearsarge Valley Going Local: Local Food, Local Business, Local Skills— is organized by the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative Task Force and students in the Environmental Studies Community-Based Research Project class.

The public is invited to attend.

Organizers want to draw upon the ideas, skills and experiences of area residents to develop positive localized solutions to discuss the regional impacts of larger global issues such as economic insecurity, environmental instabilities, and dependence on non-renewable energy.

The day will begin with an optional brunch (noon to 1:00 p.m.) that will feature live music from one of the area’s favorite folk artists, Click Horning. Brunch is $6 for adults, $3 for children.

The activities to follow will offer opportunities to find shared interests, to learn about local resources, to network share contact information, and to develop practical strategies that can be implemented in the Kearsarge Valley.

The overall direction and focus for the day will also be guided by participants’ own ideas and strategies for:

  • sustaining health and well-being,
  • creating a strong regional food system,
  • supporting a vibrant local economy and
  • developing more resilience in our region.

To RSVP, recommended but not required, email: transition.town@colby-sawyer.edu or go to Meetup.com Transition-Kearsarge

Certified Transition Trainer Tina Clarke will be the guest speaker. Clarke, of Turner Falls, Massachusetts, has worked with over 120 Transition communities across the country, and has been a trainer, program director and consultant for 25 years, supporting and guiding leaders in over 400 local, national, regional and local organizations.

Turner has directed citizen training programs for 17 national faith communities, and she directed Greenpeace USA’s national citizen Activist Network. She also founded and led campaigns on energy, environmental justice and toxins for New England Clean Water Action.

Most recently she was a consultant with 350.org, the Massachusetts Municipal Association, and the Sustainability Institute.

Turner’s passive solar, Platinum LEED, low-toxic, largely locally-built “Power House” won the Massachusetts utility company-sponsored competition, the Zero Energy Challenge, and the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association’s 2010 Zero Net Energy Award.

To learn more about this event or to RSVP, visit www.meetup.com/Transition-Kearsarge or www.kearsargetransition.com, or call Jenisha Shrestha, 205-482-2699.

CSC grads to talk about success: Poly-Recovery

New London, N.H. – Colby-Sawyer College graduates Mike Mooney and John Pelech, owners of Poly-Recovery, will return to campus Wednesday, November 28 at  7 p.m. to talk about  success and recycling. The program will be held at the Ivey Science Center, and will be hosted by CSC environmental studies students. The public is invited to attend.

Pelech and Mooney will share information about Poly-Recovery’s 100-mile model that handles waste, from pick up to new product manufacturing, all within 100-miles.

Poly-Recovery, in Portsmouth, N.H, has three goals: to eliminate landfill dumping, to reduce carbon waste, and to sustain both the environment and the local economy.

In 2012, the New Hampshire Business Review explained what success in recycling looks like: Portsmouth firms transform companies’ trash into opportunity.

This community program is part of the outreach underway by Kearsarge Valley Transition, a “local network of individuals, businesses and organizations that are committed to improving the well-being and resilience of our neighbors and communities now and into the future.”

For more info, visit Kearsarge Valley Transition or email: transition.town@colby-sawyer.edu.

Transition Town training to be held in New London, N.H.

New London, N.H. – Students in the Third Year environmental science/studies major at Colby-Sawyer College are helping to build the infrastructure for a Transition Town initiative in the Kearsarge Valley Region as a part of their Community-Based Research Project.

They are hosting a training event for the Kearsarge Valley area on the weekend of November 9th-11th, 2012. Any and all interested community members are welcome to attend the training that will be held on campus in the Curtis L. Ivey Science Center.

“If you love expanding your knowledge while connecting with other enthusiastic community members, then please join us for a weekend full of discovery, excitement, and strategizing,” the release says.

“Transition Initiatives” or “Transition Towns” bring together local networks of individuals, businesses and organizations that are committed to improving the well-being and resilience of their communities.  Drawing upon the ideas, skills and experiences of residents they develop positive localized solutions to discuss the regional impacts of larger global issues such as economic insecurity, environmental instabilities, and dependence on non-renewable energy.

To learn more about this event or to register,  visit www.kearsargetransition.wordpress.com or call Jillian Dervishian, 617-791-7910.

Tina Clarke and Simon Dennis, both Certified Transition Trainers, will facilitate this weekend event. Clarke has been an educator, advocate, director and consultant for nonprofit programs since 1985.  She has consulted with over 400 NGO’s and she has trained and advised over three dozen other Transition Initiatives.

Simon Dennis is one of the founders of Transition Town White River Junction, as well as the Center for Sustainable Practice, and has played key roles in organizing two successful community gardens.  He was also the co-founder and co-director of COVER Home Repair and the ReCover Store, a non-profit that works with volunteers to complete the community’s most urgently needed home repairs and sell donated building materials and household goods to support this mission.

This three-day course is an in-depth experiential introduction to the Transition Movement. Packed with imaginative and successful ways to engage your community, the course describes how to catalyze, build, and facilitate a successful Transition Initiative. It delves into the theory and practice of Transition that has worked well in hundreds of communities around the world.

Training Schedule:

  • Friday, Nov. 9th 5:30-9 p.m. Potluck Dinner & Discussion. Free and open to the public.
  • Saturday, Nov.10th 9:30-5:30 p.m.
  • Sunday, Dec.11th 12-5:30 p.m.

Number of participants is limited. Cost for the weekend: $90 – a few scholarships are available. For more info and to register, e-mail: transition.town@colby-sawyer.edu.

Sustainable Living Series: Planting for Pollinators

While planning and planting your garden this spring, think of our pollinators — those hard-working animals that help pollinate over 75% our flowering plants and nearly 75% of our crops.

U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service reports: “Pollinators need your help! There is increasing evidence that many pollinators are in decline.  However, there are some simple things you can do at home to encourage pollinator diversity and abundance.”

In the Lake Sunapee region, a free workshop about Appreciating Honey Bees in the Garden and Planting for Pollinators, will be held at Colby Sawyer College in New London, New Hampshire, on Saturday, May 19, from 1-3:30 p.m., at the Ivey Science Center. The workshop is open to the public and is part of the college’s Sustainable Living Series.

The workshop instructor is bee keeper Amy Antonucci, who has worked in organic agriculture for over ten years and served as vice president of the Seacoast Beekeepers Association of N.H., and organizes their annual Bee School. Amy is certified permaculture designer, goat-herder, chicken-keeper, and student of herbal medicine.

>> For more information, view the flyer below or contact Jennifer White, the college’s sustainability coordinator, at jhwhite@colby-sawyer.edu.

>> To download and share the flyer, click here. (PDF Beekeeping Flyer for 5-19-2012 1.2MB)

>> To learn more about the college’s sustainability initiatives, visit www.colby-sawyer.edu/greenroutes

New London Energy Committee Urges Dim the Lights

New London Energy Committee. Click on the logo for more information about NLEC.

The New London Energy Committee is urging area residents to dim the lights and lend support for Earth Hour at 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, March 27. “We urge you to join Town buildings, Colby-Sawyer College, area businesses and residents ‘in the dark!’”

Earth Hour involves local and global efforts.

Millions of Americans will turn out their lights for one hour in support of action on climate change and toward creating a cleaner, safer and more secure future. 2010 marks the third year of the event, which attracted more than 80 million participants in the U.S. last year and nearly a billion people around the world, as lights dimmed on such global icons as the Eiffel Tower in Paris, Sydney’s Opera House, the Great Pyramids of Gaza and New York’s Empire State Building.

On March 27, many notable U.S. landmarks — Mount Rushmore, St. Louis’ Gateway Arch, Sea World in Orlando, the strip in Las Vegas, New York’s Empire State Building, the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco, Washington D.C.’s National Cathedral, California’s Santa Monica Pier and the Space Needle in Seattle — will turn off non-essential lighting for the hour.

Send Sunapee News Earth Hour info via Leave a Comment (below).

Related article: WWF’s Earth Hour Returns for 2010 in Largest Call for Action on Climate Change in History (prweb.com)

Colby-Sawyer Goal To Be Carbon Neutral

In an article by David Sauerwein sent to SunapeeNews.com by the New London Energy Committee, Colby-Sawyer reports on efforts at the college to become carbon neutral. The college is a charter signatory member of the American College and University Presidents Climate Commitment (ACUPCC). Read more…

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