Sunapee Sightings: Along River Road

 

RiverRoad_CC_2014Apr Sunapee Sightings: How about a short walk?  Enjoy River Road in Sunapee Harbor Village, where you can take in the scenery and sights along the Sugar River. Enjoy the new Sugar River Bridge and the Sunapee Riverwalk, a 1/2 mile trail from the harbor dam to the Information Booth on Route 11. To share your favorite walking path or hiking trail in and around Sunapee, leave a reply. Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.

Sunapee Sightings: The new covered bridge!

CoveredBridge_Falls_CC_2013-07Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee: Above Hames Park falls, a new pedestrian bridge spans the Sugar RIver in Sunapee Harbor Village. It connects River Road and Main Street by the historic Harbor House Livery (old town hall building). On July 19, 2013, a crane put the wooden bridge in place.

View a short video of the bridge being put in place via the Town of Sunapee website and learn more about the project via Project Sunapee.

Read related article: Sunapee sets date for placing covered bridge (SunapeeNews.com).

Sunapee sets date for placing covered bridge

Photo courtesy of Project Sunapee.

Photo courtesy of Project Sunapee.

Sunapee, NH — The idea has been around for decades, but now it’s about to become a reality.

A new pedestrian covered bridge will soon span the Sugar River in Sunapee Harbor village.

The wooden bridge will be moved from River Road, where it has been under construction, onto its abutments that straddle the river on Friday, July 19, according to a town announcement.

The day the bridge is raised and set on the abutments “will be the day you hear cheers over Sunapee,” said Donna Gazelle, a founding member of Project Sunapee, the fiscal agent for the project.

“The exact time that the bridge will be lifted into place is unknown due to the amount of work that is necessary to set up the crane, and due to the time that is necessary to prepare the rigging that will support the bridge during the lift,” the town alert said.

Long-term community planning and an array of volunteer efforts including fund-raising has made the covered bridge a reality.

All construction is being done by Brent Stocker, Sunapee, and his son Josh Stocker, Bradford, with an able crew of volunteers.

The main structural components were designed by and purchased from Western Wood Structures in Oregon, renown experts in the field, and all other materials have been donated by local businesses.

A pedestrian bridge connecting River Road and Main Street at Sunapee Harbor was first envisioned in a town plan in 1985.

A community design charette completed in 2007 that studied the old town hall (Harbor House Livery) and village traffic flow re-enforced the bridge plan. And recent focus on re-use of the town’s Harbor House Livery gave renewed support for the project.

Time for lifting the bridge

“If all goes as planned, and if the weather cooperates, we anticipate the actual lift will take place between 9:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m.,” according to the town announcement.

The town also addressed traffic and pedestrian safety that is “critical for success.”

“The Town of Sunapee Police Department will be on site to assist with traffic and pedestrian control. Safety measures will be implemented at the intersection of River Road and High Street, along River Road from Maple Street westerly towards the bridge, and behind the Livery House.”

“River Road will be closed to all through vehicular traffic from Maple Street to High Street during this event. Residents and media personnel will be permitted to enter within the Work Zone of the project.”

“Residents and media personnel who wish to observe the activities will be allowed to do so from locations that will be outside the perimeter of the Work Zone. Public parking for this event is per all applicable Town Ordinances,” according to the town.

For more photos and information about the Sunapee Bridge Project, visit: Project Sunapee.

Sunapee Flash Bash showcases student photos

 

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‘Ice out’ on Lake Sunapee

Ice Out Day on Lake Sunapee was Thursday, April 18, 2013. In the morning, a mass of  ice blocked boat passage north to south on the lake. However, the ice was gone by 2:30 that afternoon. "Ice out" is determined when a boat is able to navigate the length of the lake from Georges Mills to Newbury. Photo by Charleen Osborne, Sunapee.

Ice Out Day on Lake Sunapee was Thursday, April 18, 2013. In the morning, a mass of ice blocked boat passage north to south on the lake. However, the ice was gone by 2:30 that afternoon. “Ice out” is determined when a boat is able to navigate the length of the lake from Georges Mills to Newbury. Photo by Charleen Osborne, Sunapee.

Sunapee, N.H. — “Ice out” on Lake Sunapee was declared on Thursday, April 18, 2013.

Ice blocked boat passage from north to south at the islands at 8 a.m. By 2:30 p.m. the ice mass was gone and “Ice Out” was called by Richard Osborne and his family.

“Ice out” is determined when a boat is able to navigate the length of the lake from Georges Mills to Newbury.

See earlier “ice out” dates via the town website: Lake Sunapee Ice Out Chart.

Local Flash Bash seeks photos from Sunapee students

FlashBash Flyer 2013Sunapee, N.H. — Project Sunapee announces Flash Bash for Sunapee students: a photography show of places and faces in Sunapee.

All students in the Elementary and Middle High schools are invited to submit photos to the show, which will be on display to the public on Friday, May 10, from 5 to 7 p.m., and Saturday, May 11, from noon to 5 p.m., at the Harbor House Livery, Sunapee Harbor.

The deadline for entries is May 1, 2013.

Each entry can include two images; a committee will choose one to print for the show. For more information including a photo submission form, visit: www.ProjectSunapee.org

A local non-profit, Project Sunapee, in coordination with Meagan Reed’s Law and Government Class at Sunapee High School, is sponsoring the event.

Questions?  Email: sunapeeflashbash@gmail.com.

Photo of Sunapee’s Harbor House Livery is a contest finalist. Voting is underway.

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Photos of Sunapee’s Harbor House Livery courtesy of Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.

Sunapee, N.H. — A dramatic winter photograph of the historic Harbor House Livery in Sunapee Harbor Village is one of 50 finalists in Kearsarge Magazine’s First Annual Photo Contest.

Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee, submitted the entry.

“My entry (listed #11 in the magazine contest) was taken on a beautiful January morning,” said Charlotte.

She also submitted a photo of ducks.

“It’s usually quiet in the harbor off-season and several ducks (#26) take advantage of the peaceful water there.”

The Kearsarge Magazine announced its First Annual Photography Contest earlier this year looking for photos of people, places and things in the Lake Sunapee/Kearsarge region.

“Many of the area’s amateur photographers have submitted their best shots and now is the time to vote at the Kearsarge Magazine website,” explained Charlotte. Voting continues until Friday, April 5, 2013.

Sunapee’s Harbor House Livery, seen from the back and reflected in the river, has become Charlotte’s number one subject. She photographs the view throughout the year and at different times of the day.

“I keep my camera with me at all times,” added Charlotte, who is a retired Sunapee schoolteacher.  “I never know when or where I’ll find a photo opportunity and Sunapee Harbor is a great place to visit any day or time.”

To view the contest finalists and pick your favorite, visit the Kearsarge Magazine.

The magazine will publish the winning image in its summer issue.

Sunapee Sighting: Have you seen a bald eagle recently?

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Sunapee, N.H. – Have you seen a bald eagle recently?

Might an eagle pair be in the process of establishing a breeding territory in the Lake Sunapee watershed?

A recent Sunapee Sighting posted on SunapeeNews.com prompted Rem Mastin, Sunapee, to comment:

“Speaking of Sightings: A few days ago, while heading toward Newport, on Rt. 11 before Rt 103, close to the Treatment Plant road [in Sunapee], I was distracted for a moment as a beautiful BALD EAGLE flew right down the Sugar River by the highway. Did anyone else have any current sightings in that area?”

In mid-December (2012), Susan Parmenter, Sunapee, who is a keen observer of nature and birds, snapped this photo of a bald eagle on a patch of ice in Job’s Creek, Lake Sunapee. At the time, the lake had not yet frozen over. Several days later, she also saw a bald eagle flying along the Sugar River in Claremont, N.H.

A bald eagle “soaring over the Newbury side of Lake Sunapee near the State Beach,” around 4 p.m. on February 16, was posted on BaldEagleInfo.com. And Kittie Wilson, author of “All Things Pleasant on the Lake” wrote about bald eagles sightings this winter around Pleasant Lake in New London.

Bald eagles in the Connecticut River region

The Sugar River, a tributary of the Connecticut River, flows west from the outlet of Lake Sunapee at Sunapee Harbor, along Wendell Marsh, and then through Newport and Claremont. The Sugar River joins the Connecticut across from Ascutney, Vermont.

All tributaries of the Connecticut River north of the Massachusetts state line are part of a “recovery initiative” — the Connecticut River Bald Eagle Restoration and Habitat Protection Project, Chris Martin writes in NH Audubon Afield (Spring 2013). Martin is a senior biologist at NH Audubon. He coordinates a statewide bald eagle monitoring and management program under a contract between NH Audubon and NH Fish & Game.

“An amazing resettlement by eagles is underway on the Connecticut, as pairs reclaim ancestral breeding areas that have been vacant for decades,” Martin reports.

See: Bald Eagles: New Hampshire’s regal predators reclaim the Connecticut by Chris Martin

“Recovery of the bald eagle population across the Granite State mirrors the rebound taking place in the Connecticut River watershed,” according to Martin. “Across New Hampshire in 2012, biologists confirmed 35 territorial pairs of eagles. Twenty of these pairs had productive nests, and a total of 33 young eagles fledged.”

In New England, adult bald eagles live essentially year-round within their breeding territories. They can be found near their nests in any season. Nests tend to be located high in white pines or cottonwoods and close to predictable food resources found in the always-open water below dams, near rapids, or in tidal areas. Other pairs capitalize on food sources available at livestock farms or local highway department road-kill dumps. An eagle pair maintains their nest throughout the year, but nest-building activities really ramp up as the breeding season arrives in February. Most pairs in New Hampshire will lay eggs in March, hatch young in April, and fledge full-sized 11 to 12-week-old juveniles in July. – Senior Biologist Chris Martin for NH Audubon

To comment or if you have an eagle sighting or other Sunapee Sighting to share, please leave a reply.

See NH Audubon (for info and birding resources, including sightings and list serves) and NH Fish & Game.

Sunapee Sighting: Looks like a wet winter storm

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Sunapee, N.H. – A window onto the weather for February 27, 2013

confirms a wet Winter Storm Warning for the Lake Sunapee region:

“rain/snow” followed by “snow/sleet”

“rain/snow” likely for Thursday

Sunapee Sightings: Field of snow

Cold January weekend_JC

It’s a cold winter’s day.

Lined by fencing,

framed by clouds,

a field of snow

fills the rolling landscape.

Along Harding Hill Road, Sunapee. Photo by Joan Chandler, Sunapee.

MV Kearsarge and Steamboat Kearsarge “Sunk in Ice”

Kearsarge photos_SHSLake Sunapee, N.H. – The similar look of being sunk in ice. The MV Kearsarge (left) sank into the ice on Lake Sunapee in January 2013, and the steamboat Kearsarge (shown in the photo on the right) had a similar experience… some 80 years ago.

The old photo (on the right) reads: “Steamboat Kearsarge, Sunk in ice near Davis Cabins, Lake Sunapee – Circa 1933?, Sunapee Historical Society Collection.”

Photos courtesy of the Sunapee Historical Society and local historian Ron Garceau.

Look for these photos in the March 2013 issue of SooNipi Magazine.

Read related articles:

MV Kearsarge is afloat! (SunapeeNews.com)

MV Kearsarge back afloat after small hole detected (UnionLeader.com)

MV Kearsarge is afloat!

MVK_CC7

Sunday, January 13, 2013, MV Kearsarge afloat at Sunapee Harbor. Photos by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.

The MV Kearsarge is afloat dockside at Sunapee Harbor.

Late yesterday, Saturday afternoon, salvage workers lifted the stern off the bottom of Lake Sunapee.

The restaurant boat took on icy water Thursday evening while at its berth, the town dock. The boat’s stern sank in about eight feet of water.

MVK_CC8“Still foggy, yet quieter at Sunapee Harbor on Sunday,” wrote Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee, who shares these photos. “You can hear the sound of the water pump and see the dinner boat now floating at the dock.”

Saturday the harbor was busy with hundreds of curious onlookers while the salvage crew worked throughout the day to raise the boat.

“A salvage team stabilized the vessel Friday afternoon using a sling wrapped around the boat and secured to a cable from a truck,” wrote Valley News correspondent Patrick O’Grady in the newspaper’s Sunday edition.

“Yesterday, divers placed several large airbags underneath the stern of the boat. When inflated, they began easing the boat out of the water, eliciting cheers from onlookers, many of whom were standing on the harbor ice.”

The owners of the Kearsarge (and its sister boat the MV Sunapee II), the Fenton family, expect to repair the dinner boat and have it in service for the summer.

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Read related article via SunapeeNews.com – Lake Sunapee MV Kearsarge sinks, awaits crane and salvage

Lake Sunapee MV Kearsarge sinks, awaits crane and salvage

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“It’s pretty much sunk, most of it is on the bottom,” said owner Peter Fenton, reports Dan Seufert for the Union Leader.  Read more via MV Kearsarge sinks at Sunapee dock | New Hampshire NEWS07.

The popular local restaurant boat took on water Thursday while tied up at its berth on Lake Sunapee, the town dock at Sunapee Harbor.

Salvage efforts are underway. A crane will be brought in Saturday to lift the boat, according to several news reports. The scene has attracted wide-spread interest and media coverage.

MV Kearsarge has been sailing Lake Sunapee for 30 years. It operates from May to October hosting dinners and special functions.

The boat’s stern settled into the icy water to the bottom of the lake, which is shallow dock side. It makes for a sad sight.

On Facebook posted Friday, the Peter Fentons, owners of the boat and Sunapee Cruises, expressed their thanks “to the community for all the good thoughts and support that you have sent our way these past 24 hours. We are so lucky to live in such a great, thoughtful and caring community.”

“We are very thankful that no one was injured and to be working on a solution with great people. Tomorrow [Saturday], we will be working with a salvage company to determine the best way to raise the Kearsarge. We are still looking into what caused this issue and hope to know more tomorrow. Thank you again for your thoughts and support; this is why we love this area.”

Related article via WMUR: MV Kearsarge restaurant ship sinks

via SunapeeNews.com: Lake Sunapee dinner boat takes on icy water

Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee

Behind the name: Georges Mills

Welcome to Georges Mills. Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.

Welcome to Georges Mills. Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.

Sunapee, N.H. – Georges Mills, Muzzey Hill, Cooper Street, Russell Place, all tell interesting stories. However, sometimes the stories behind village names are not readily apparent.

Along busy Route 11, the Newport Road, between exits 12 and 12A off Interstate-89, a sign welcomes you to Georges Mills in the Lake Sunapee area. Georges Mills is an unincorporated village of Sunapee. Daniel George was one of the town’s early settlers and a mill owner.

Sunapee is another New England town shaped by forces of nature and man. Thriving mills once dotted the region’s rivers and streams.

The road skirts the southern shore of Otter Pond and then passes Georges Mills Harbor, at the northern tip of Lake Sunapee, and passes over streams that feed the lake.

In the early 1800s, George built and operated mills along these streams. He operated a grist mill, the first mill in the village, built by Archibald Hersey in 1798. Back then families grew their grains for milling… into flour, cornmeal, buckwheat, and barley.

George was industrious and later built a new grist mill and a saw mill. He also built his home in the village, on the corner of the Springfield and Newport roads. It is nestled next to the present day Georges Mills General Store, which has its own story to tell: It once housed horses and carriages used by “Uncle Charles Russell,” who transported mail from Georges Mills to Sunapee.

Cooper, Muzzey and Russell

Although long gone, another mill built in the village operated under different owners from the 1820s to 1920s. The mill started by carding and dressing wool. Later it turned into a shingling, planing and board sawing mill.

Across the stream from the shingle mill was a cooper shop (1820 – 1825), which bustled with activity manufacturing a variety of wooden measures, barrels, scoops and containers.

These businesses were by the dam on Cooper Street, which loops down to Georges Mills Harbor.

On the hill heading toward Sunapee, in 1818, Moses Muzzey built the first blacksmith shop in Georges Mills. Muzzey Hill remains a common reference point.

Russell Place, now the home of condominiums at the bottom of Prospect Hill Road, also has a story. The building once served as the village post office and store under several owners including the Russell family.

GeorgesMillsPO

Old Georges Mills, N.H. photo shows T. O. Russell Meats and Groceries (1936-1948) on Prospect HilL Road. Tony Russell owned the store at the time. It also housed village the post office.

In 1898, Charles Russell installed the first telephone company in Georges Mills; it connected the store with Newport. Until 1906 and again from 1936 to 1948, the Russells operated the store, thought to be the oldest in the village and built about 1835 by Burpee & Colcord.

You can find pictures and stories about the enterprising people who settled the area in the “Sunapee Bicentennial 1768-1968,” a booklet reproduced for the Sunapee Historical Society. It’s available for sale ($10) at the Sunapee Historical Society and SooNipi Publishing Company.

Have a local story to share? Contact SunapeeNews.com.

Sunapee Sighting: Remembrance of our WWI soldiers

May 28, 2012 – Photos courtesy of Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee: A memorial stone on the lawn at Abbott Library, Route 11, Sunapee, remembers our World War I soldiers. Read the “honor roll” by scrolling down and clicking on the image.

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