Ausbon Sargent sponsors talk on wildlife, climate change

Photo by Jim Sandberg

Moose crossing during the Kearsarge Klassic, Ausbon Sargent’s randonnee. Photo by Jim Sandberg

New London, N.H. – The Outreach Committee of the Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust will host “How You Can Help Wildlife Adapt to Climate Change” starting at 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Nov. 6 at the Wilmot Community Association’s Red Barn, 64 Village Road, Wilmot.

Emily Preston, a wildlife biologist with the N.H. Fish and Game’s Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program, will give an illustrated overview about how climate change will affect wildlife and how our actions can either help or hinder that. Climate change will affect wildlife in many ways, especially though changes in habitat.

Preston will discuss the effects on moose, birds, northern shrimp and other species. She will present the “Ecosystems and Wildlife Climate Change Adaptation Plan” and will discuss several ways participants may help wildlife adapt to changing habitat.

N.H. Fish and Game’s Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Program, established in 1988, is the steward for the state’s nongame wildlife – species not hunted, fished or trapped. Through wildlife monitoring and management, plus outreach and education, the Nongame Program works to protect more than 400 species of mammals, birds, reptiles, and amphibians, and thousands of insects and other invertebrates.

Refreshments will be served.

Registration is requested by Monday, Nov. 3 for this free workshop. Registration is available from Nancy Smith at the Ausbon Sargent office, (603) 526-6555, or by email: nsmith@ausbonsargent.org.

Ausbon Sargent, established in 1987, is a non-profit land trust whose mission is to preserve the rural landscape in 12 towns in the Mount Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee region. These towns include Andover, Bradford, Danbury, Grantham, Goshen, Newbury, New London, Springfield, Sunapee, Sutton, Wilmot and Warner. 

SRK Greenway announces Autumn Hikes and Trail Work

2014 Oct Q2c AdLake Sunapee Region, N.H. — The SRK (Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge) Greenway Coalition kicks off its October schedule of outings with a six-mile, classic New Hampshire hike (moderately difficult) on Mt. Kearsarge, from Winslow State Park to Valley Road in North Sutton, on Saturday, October 4. See the SRKGC website calendar for details.

Trail work follows at Mount Sunapee State Park on the Summit Trail on Sunday, October 12. This is a cooperative undertaking of the SRKGC and the Goshen Conservation Commission. After an easy half-mile hike to the work site, the task at hand is to clear water drains on Mount Sunapee’s beautiful western slope trail

Other hikes and trail work follow throughout the month. The public is invited to participate. For more information and to sign up, visit: www.srkg.com.

The SRK Greenway is a 75-mile loop of hiking trails, surrounding Lake Sunapee, crossing Sunapee, Ragged, and Kearsarge Mountains, and maintained by Greenway volunteers. The Greenway’s mission is to create and maintain a forever green, great circle of trail corridors and conserved lands providing walkers with minimally-developed access to the mountains, lakes, vistas and historical sites of the region.

Little Loon Grows Up at LSPA July 22

Sunapee, N.H. — Tonight (Tuesday, July 22) at the Lake Sunapee Protective Association headquarters at Sunapee Harbor, Kittie Wilson will present Little Loon Grows Up! — her observations and photographs of the loon family of Pleasant Lake in New London. The program starts at 7 p.m. and is open to all free of charge. Visit the LSPA website for more information: www.lakesunapee.org or call 603-763-2210.

Related links:

“Come Listen to the Loons” by Kittie Wilson (YouTube video)

Loon Preservation Committee (N.H.) - Live LoonCam

 

 

 

 

NH Audubon hosts Birds of a Feather: Art by Parmenter and Wiggin

Nest by Susan Parmenter

Birds of a Feather, an exhibit of paintings by Susan Parmenter and Mimi Wiggin, will be on display during July and August at the McLane Audubon Center in Concord, N.H.  Shown here: “Handiwork” (oil on panel) by Susan Parmenter of Sunapee, N.H.

Concord, N.H. — During July and August, the McLane Audubon Center will be hosting Birds of a Feather, an exhibit of beautiful paintings of birds and bird related items. Artists Susan Parmenter of Sunapee and Mimi Wiggin of Warner have teamed up to share some of their pieces that have captured the beauty of fleeting birds in hopes of inspiring others to help protect birds and their habitats.

A public artist’s reception will be held on Thursday, July 10 from 4:30-6:30 p.m.  All are welcome.

To view the exhibit other times, call ahead (603-224-9909) to confirm availability.  The center at 84 Silk Farm Road in Concord is open Monday-Friday from 9:00-5:00 and Saturdays from 10:00-4:00.

A realist painter, Susan Parmenter enjoys painting in both oil and pastel and often sketches outdoors. Favorite subjects include landscape, figure, still life, animals, birds, wildlife and the beauty of nature in general.

Currently, Susan is a member of the High Street Painters in Brattleboro, Vermont, and the Portrait Society of America. She is also a member of NH Audubon, The Nature Conservancy and The American Bird Conservancy. Susan has won many awards participating in a variety of national art events and enjoys teaching.

View a sample of Susan’s work and learn about other upcoming shows at www.susanparmenter.com

Chickadee by Mini Wiggin of Warner, N.H.

Chickadee by Mini Wiggin of Warner, N.H.

Mimi Wiggin paints with oils and is primarily self-taught.  Her work has been displayed throughout New Hampshire and has been featured in Kearsarge Magazine, SooNipi Magazine, The Art & Gallery Guide, and Forest Notes.  Mimi is currently painting backyard birds for a small book to be published in the fall of 2014.

To learn more about Mimi and see samples of her work visit: www.mimiwiggin.com.

Partial proceeds of sales of art that is displayed at NH Audubon goes to support its mission.

To learn more about this show and other programs, festivals and projects call 603-224-9909 or visit the website: www.nhaudubon.org.

 

Two guided tours of the Hay Estate offered in June

The Fells 013Newbury, N.H. – The Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests and The Fells Historic Estate and Gardens are co-sponsoring two historical walks, called “The Hidden History of the Hay Estate,” on Wednesday, June 4, and Wednesday, June 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Hay Forest Reservation in Newbury.

Both walks will be guided by Dave Anderson, the director of education for the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests.

Participants of the June 4 walk will examine evidence suggesting what the Hay estate was like during the era of Clarence L. Hay. Walkers will stop at the cement cistern that fed water to The Fells, see the ruins of a sugarhouse, visit the Milton Clark/Nathan Baker farm cellar complex – the last and most expensive parcel purchased by statesman John Milton Hay, secretary to Pres. Abe Lincoln — and walk along the “Old Farm Road Trail” to see the Sarah Bartlett cellar-hole. Walking distance is about two miles.

Participants of the June 18 walk will discover how the Hay family and workers on the estate experienced The Fells from evidence and artifacts that are hidden in plain sight. They’ll tour the “Coach Road Trail” (the historic road used by the Hays to access a favorite picnic spot on Sunset Hill); a unique swath of forest that hosted hurricane salvage operations along Lake Sunapee; the ruins of a water pumping shed; and the site of the former swimming dock located south of the mouth of Beech Brook. Walking distance is estimated to be 1.5 miles.

Attendance at Part 2 is not contingent upon attendance at Part 1. The cost is $5 for each walk. These events, which start at The Fells Welcome Kiosk, are supported by grants from the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation’s Wellborn Ecology Fund and the Creekmore and Adele Fath Charitable Foundation.

To register, call 603-763-4789 x3.

Founded in 1901, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests is the state’s oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization. Supported by 10,000 families and businesses, the Forest Society’s mission is to perpetuate the state’s forests by promoting land conservation and sustainable forestry. The organization owns 50,000 conserved acres of land in New Hampshire and holds conservation easements on another 115,000 acres.

 

 

 

 

Sunapee Gardeners: Help Wanted

Sunapee gardeners

The Sunapee Gardeners plant the Memorial Garden at the entrance to the boat ramp at Sunapee Harbor.

Sunapee, N. H. – The Sunapee Gardeners are off to a great start.  Summer annuals are on order for planting the first week in June.

Now the local gardening group is looking for a few more volunteers: male,  female, snowbirds or full-timers.

“The Gardeners are a fun, friendly group dedicated to making our town beautiful while maintaining gardens between Georges Mills and the harbor,” said the release.  “Give us a few hours a month and we promise you camaraderie, a sense of accomplishment and the satisfaction of knowing you have contributed to the natural beauty of our area.”

“Lively monthly meetings,  educational and social activities, and area garden tours round out the menu.”

Call or e-mail Peg Chalmers for more information at 763-5562 or mmchalmers@myfairpoint.net.

Harbor garden

The Sunapee Gardeners plant and maintain gardens from Georges Mills to Sunapee Harbor village, including the Memorial Garden, shown here when in full bloom.

Photos courtesy of the Sunapee Gardeners.

 

Sunapee Sightings: Along River Road

 

RiverRoad_CC_2014Apr Sunapee Sightings: How about a short walk?  Enjoy River Road in Sunapee Harbor Village, where you can take in the scenery and sights along the Sugar River. Enjoy the new Sugar River Bridge and the Sunapee Riverwalk, a 1/2 mile trail from the harbor dam to the Information Booth on Route 11. To share your favorite walking path or hiking trail in and around Sunapee, leave a reply. Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.

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