Little Loon Grows Up at LSPA July 22

Sunapee, N.H. — Tonight (Tuesday, July 22) at the Lake Sunapee Protective Association headquarters at Sunapee Harbor, Kittie Wilson will present Little Loon Grows Up! — her observations and photographs of the loon family of Pleasant Lake in New London. The program starts at 7 p.m. and is open to all free of charge. Visit the LSPA website for more information: www.lakesunapee.org or call 603-763-2210.

Related links:

“Come Listen to the Loons” by Kittie Wilson (YouTube video)

Loon Preservation Committee (N.H.) - Live LoonCam

 

 

 

 

NH Audubon hosts Birds of a Feather: Art by Parmenter and Wiggin

Nest by Susan Parmenter

Birds of a Feather, an exhibit of paintings by Susan Parmenter and Mimi Wiggin, will be on display during July and August at the McLane Audubon Center in Concord, N.H.  Shown here: “Handiwork” (oil on panel) by Susan Parmenter of Sunapee, N.H.

Concord, N.H. — During July and August, the McLane Audubon Center will be hosting Birds of a Feather, an exhibit of beautiful paintings of birds and bird related items. Artists Susan Parmenter of Sunapee and Mimi Wiggin of Warner have teamed up to share some of their pieces that have captured the beauty of fleeting birds in hopes of inspiring others to help protect birds and their habitats.

A public artist’s reception will be held on Thursday, July 10 from 4:30-6:30 p.m.  All are welcome.

To view the exhibit other times, call ahead (603-224-9909) to confirm availability.  The center at 84 Silk Farm Road in Concord is open Monday-Friday from 9:00-5:00 and Saturdays from 10:00-4:00.

A realist painter, Susan Parmenter enjoys painting in both oil and pastel and often sketches outdoors. Favorite subjects include landscape, figure, still life, animals, birds, wildlife and the beauty of nature in general.

Currently, Susan is a member of the High Street Painters in Brattleboro, Vermont, and the Portrait Society of America. She is also a member of NH Audubon, The Nature Conservancy and The American Bird Conservancy. Susan has won many awards participating in a variety of national art events and enjoys teaching.

View a sample of Susan’s work and learn about other upcoming shows at www.susanparmenter.com

Chickadee by Mini Wiggin of Warner, N.H.

Chickadee by Mini Wiggin of Warner, N.H.

Mimi Wiggin paints with oils and is primarily self-taught.  Her work has been displayed throughout New Hampshire and has been featured in Kearsarge Magazine, SooNipi Magazine, The Art & Gallery Guide, and Forest Notes.  Mimi is currently painting backyard birds for a small book to be published in the fall of 2014.

To learn more about Mimi and see samples of her work visit: www.mimiwiggin.com.

Partial proceeds of sales of art that is displayed at NH Audubon goes to support its mission.

To learn more about this show and other programs, festivals and projects call 603-224-9909 or visit the website: www.nhaudubon.org.

 

Two guided tours of the Hay Estate offered in June

The Fells 013Newbury, N.H. – The Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests and The Fells Historic Estate and Gardens are co-sponsoring two historical walks, called “The Hidden History of the Hay Estate,” on Wednesday, June 4, and Wednesday, June 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Hay Forest Reservation in Newbury.

Both walks will be guided by Dave Anderson, the director of education for the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests.

Participants of the June 4 walk will examine evidence suggesting what the Hay estate was like during the era of Clarence L. Hay. Walkers will stop at the cement cistern that fed water to The Fells, see the ruins of a sugarhouse, visit the Milton Clark/Nathan Baker farm cellar complex – the last and most expensive parcel purchased by statesman John Milton Hay, secretary to Pres. Abe Lincoln — and walk along the “Old Farm Road Trail” to see the Sarah Bartlett cellar-hole. Walking distance is about two miles.

Participants of the June 18 walk will discover how the Hay family and workers on the estate experienced The Fells from evidence and artifacts that are hidden in plain sight. They’ll tour the “Coach Road Trail” (the historic road used by the Hays to access a favorite picnic spot on Sunset Hill); a unique swath of forest that hosted hurricane salvage operations along Lake Sunapee; the ruins of a water pumping shed; and the site of the former swimming dock located south of the mouth of Beech Brook. Walking distance is estimated to be 1.5 miles.

Attendance at Part 2 is not contingent upon attendance at Part 1. The cost is $5 for each walk. These events, which start at The Fells Welcome Kiosk, are supported by grants from the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation’s Wellborn Ecology Fund and the Creekmore and Adele Fath Charitable Foundation.

To register, call 603-763-4789 x3.

Founded in 1901, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests is the state’s oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization. Supported by 10,000 families and businesses, the Forest Society’s mission is to perpetuate the state’s forests by promoting land conservation and sustainable forestry. The organization owns 50,000 conserved acres of land in New Hampshire and holds conservation easements on another 115,000 acres.

 

 

 

 

Sunapee Gardeners: Help Wanted

Sunapee gardeners

The Sunapee Gardeners plant the Memorial Garden at the entrance to the boat ramp at Sunapee Harbor.

Sunapee, N. H. – The Sunapee Gardeners are off to a great start.  Summer annuals are on order for planting the first week in June.

Now the local gardening group is looking for a few more volunteers: male,  female, snowbirds or full-timers.

“The Gardeners are a fun, friendly group dedicated to making our town beautiful while maintaining gardens between Georges Mills and the harbor,” said the release.  “Give us a few hours a month and we promise you camaraderie, a sense of accomplishment and the satisfaction of knowing you have contributed to the natural beauty of our area.”

“Lively monthly meetings,  educational and social activities, and area garden tours round out the menu.”

Call or e-mail Peg Chalmers for more information at 763-5562 or mmchalmers@myfairpoint.net.

Harbor garden

The Sunapee Gardeners plant and maintain gardens from Georges Mills to Sunapee Harbor village, including the Memorial Garden, shown here when in full bloom.

Photos courtesy of the Sunapee Gardeners.

 

Sunapee Sightings: Along River Road

 

RiverRoad_CC_2014Apr Sunapee Sightings: How about a short walk?  Enjoy River Road in Sunapee Harbor Village, where you can take in the scenery and sights along the Sugar River. Enjoy the new Sugar River Bridge and the Sunapee Riverwalk, a 1/2 mile trail from the harbor dam to the Information Booth on Route 11. To share your favorite walking path or hiking trail in and around Sunapee, leave a reply. Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.

Sunapee Green-Up Day set for May 3

Sunapee, N.H. — Sunapee Green-Up Day is coming up. Volunteers are needed for this annual road-side clean up set for Saturday, May 3, 2014, from 9 a.m. to noon. The raindate is Sunday, May 4.

Green-Up Day is a tradition in town. Family and friends turn out and pick up roadside litter town wide. The volunteers then gather at noon at Sunapee Harbor for a picnic that is sponsored by local businesses and organizations.

Volunteer forms are available at Abbott Library and the Sunapee Town Office building, Edgemont Road, and on the event website.

Participants are asked to bring their completed form to the sign-in at the Safety Services Building, 9 Sargent Road, at 9 a.m. on the morning of the event to get a clean up area assignment. The form asks where you would like to participate. For reference, see the Green-Up Day Maps link, and click here for the Volunteer Form.

 

Upper Valley Naturalist Training Registration Now Open

UVLT Naturalist Training-walk in the woodsUpper Valley, N.H. — The Upper Valley Land Trust and Hulbert Outdoor Center are sponsoring an Upper Valley Naturalist Training from April 23-May 17, 2013.

The Upper Valley Naturalist Training program is an in-depth introduction to the ecosystems and wildlife found in the Upper Valley region of Vermont and New Hampshire.

The training is designed to be accessible for the beginning naturalist, but also of interest to more seasoned naturalists, particularly those looking for a way to share their knowledge with the larger community.

The training will include four Wednesday evening classroom presentations and four Saturday field sessions.

Topics will be presented by local experts and include geology, plant communities, wetland ecology, birds, interpretive techniques and more. Space is limited, so interested participants should register now.

For more information and the training schedule, visit www.uvlt.org or call 603-643-6626.

Muster Field Farm Museum to hold Ice Harvest Day Jan. 26

IceHarvesting_MFFM

Photo by Gretchen Gudefin.

North Sutton, N.H. — It soon will be ice harvesting time, when families gather, bundle up and share a New England tradition at Kezar Lake and Muster Field Farm Museum.

The farm will hold its annual Ice Harvest Day at Horse Beach in North Sutton on Sunday, January 26, 2014, from 9 a.m. until the ice is in.

Help cut ice blocks from the lake for delivery up to the farm.

Using an ice block fulcrum, volunteers will load the ice blocks onto wagons and vehicles then haul it to the farm’s Ice House, where it will be stacked for use at  summer events.

The farm’s Ryder Corner School House will be warm and welcoming, serving  homemade desserts and hot beverages.

Pete Lauridsen and friends will display antique cars converted to snowmobiles at the farm and the Sutton Ridgerunners will stage an Ice Day ride-in for all area snowmobilers. Free admission (donations appreciated).  Rain date: February 2.

For more information and directions: 603-926-4276 or www.musterfieldfarm.com.

Sutton Historical Society Pancake Breakfast

Warm up beforehand at the fifth annual pancake breakfast sponsored by the Sutton Historical Society, in North Sutton’s Free Will Baptist Church, from 7 to 10 a.m. Enjoy all-you-can-eat plain or blueberry pancakes, local maple syrup, sausage, orange juice, coffee, tea, or hot chocolate.  Cost: $6.00 for adults, $3.00 for kids.  A $1.00 discount if you come by snowmobile, x-c skis or snowshoes. Rain date: February 2.

Sunapee Gardeners weave magic with flowers

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Visitors admire blooms in the Clara Osborne Garden, also known as the Long Garden that extends along Main Street at Sunapee Harbor.

By Peggy Chalmers

Sunapee, N. H. — When summer arrives, Sunapee Harbor and other spots around town burst into bloom. Flowers magically appear… along Main Street, on the harbor bridge, at the Town Beaches and tucked into window boxes of Town Hall.

Behind the magic is a dedicated group of volunteers, the Sunapee Gardeners, who tend more than a dozen locations stretching from Georges Mills to Sunapee Harbor.

The Gardeners plan and plant a mix of perennials and annuals, and then religiously water and weed them throughout the flowering season.

Their efforts don’t stop with the first frost. Just before Thanksgiving, the Gardeners decorate the harbor area for the holiday season. Instead of flowers, the window boxes, barrels, lamp posts, and even the flag pole bloom with festive greenery and red bows.

Raised garden by the docks provides beauty and is just the right height so visitors can sit and enjoy the harbor. Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee, N.H.

Raised garden by the public dock at Sunapee Harbor provides beauty and is just the right height so visitors can sit and enjoy the view. Photo by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee, N.H.

The Gardeners’ history

The Gardeners trace their beginnings to 1990 when a group of Sunapee residents gathered to discuss how to improve Sunapee and the village center at Sunapee Harbor.

Participant Ellie Goddard with the help of a group of volunteers and then Road Agent Tony Bergeron began with planning and enhancements to areas around the public boat ramp and the Ben Mere green.

The group’s vision was bigger than removing just some bushes and weeds. It dreamed of beautiful flowers enhancing the town. After petitioning the Selectmen, the Gardeners received permission to create new gardens plus an allotment to purchase flowers.

As their efforts expanded, more volunteers came forward and today the Sunapee Gardeners efforts extend from the window boxes on Town Hall and Information Booth to flower barrels at the two town beaches. Flowers also bloom in the old horse trough on Main Street and in Hames Park, a garden gem tucked into the hillside overlooking the Sugar River.

Memorial Garden honors loved ones

In 1997, the original island planter at Sunapee Harbor was dedicated as a Memorial Garden, a special place to honor loved ones. It is fully funded by donations that are recorded in a leather bound book.

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Sunapee Gardeners in their identifying purple t-shirts gather near the gazebo prior to their annual Remembrance Ceremony.

On the first Wednesday in August during band concert intermission, the Gardeners hold a special Remembrance Ceremony during which each remembrance is read, and for every ten names, a candle is lit. The event is a celebration of life, and in that vein, the Ceremony is followed by homemade cookies and beverages distributed by the Gardeners.

Approximately 10 years ago, the Gardeners sponsored a garden tour that unexpectedly raised several thousand dollars. The Selectmen recommended a Town Committee should manage the funds, and so the Beautification Committee was formed under co-chairs Donna Gazelle and Barbara Cooper.

Sunapee_Gardens_020

Harbor bridge boxes create an eye-popping view.

The BC tackled major projects, including the installations of a granite raised-planter by the docks, parking lot curbing, a handicap accessible path to the gazebo, and a faux-brick sidewalk to identify the preferred crossings between the dock and gazebo. The Committee also planted trees, as well as a shrub screen along one side of the harbor green.  When the funds were expended in 2012, the Beautification Committee disbanded, but many of its gardening activities were folded into the Gardeners.

Volunteer gardeners welcome

The Sunapee Gardeners are always looking for new volunteers to help them keep Sunapee beautiful. Men or women, full-time or summer residents—are welcome. Gardening knowledge is not required, only a willingness to help and to get your hands dirty. Interested?

For more information, call Peggy Chalmers, the Sunapee Gardeners chairperson, 603-763-5562.

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The hidden garden in Hames Park along the Sugar River creates a restful place to sit and reflect.

Photos courtesy of the Sunapee Gardeners unless otherwise noted.

Read related article and see other Hames Park photos: Sunapee’s Hames Park, a gem along the Sugar River tells of times past (SunapeeNews.com).

Muster Field Farm will celebrate Farm Days

Muster Field sunflowers and barnNorth Sutton, N.H. — Muster Field Farm announcement — The August Farm Days Celebration at Muster Field Farm Museum in North Sutton will be held Saturday and Sunday, August 24 and 25, 2013.

Enjoy the museum’s largest event of the year, a two-‐day celebration of all things agricultural, historical, and farm-related: blacksmithing, basket making, weaving, rug braiding, square dancing and much more!

Explore an extensive display of antique tractors and trucks while children enjoy free hayrides and homemade ice cream. Cheer on the Grande Parade of antique vehicles each day at 3:00 and take your chances at Cow Flop Bingo on Saturday at 4:00. Don’t miss the famous roast beef supper Saturday from 5-7 p.m. in the Hardy-Pillsbury Barn. Tickets for the supper are $10 for adults and $5 for children, available by reservation (603‐927‐4440), or at the Farm Days information booth.

As always, fresh Muster Field Farm grown vegetables are available in the farm stand.

Farm Days hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine. General admission is $5; free for members and for children 6 and under. Information and directions: 603-927-4276 or 603-927-4440, and at http://www.musterfieldfarm.com.

Trailwork volunteers needed in the Lake Sunapee Region

Mount Sunapee's Lake Solitude

The highland trails in the region’s state parks, such as on Mount Sunapee and on Mount Kearsarge in Winslow State Park, are seeing more and more hikers each year. Photo shows Lake Solitude, near the top of Mount Sunapee.

Hikers, walkers and outdoor enthusiasts: The hiking trails in the Lake Sunapee region need your help.

“The need is never-ending to identify and encourage new volunteers who can build and maintain the area’s trails,” says Gerry Gold for the Trails Committee of the Sunapee-Ragged-Kearsarge Greenway Coalition.

SRKG, an all-volunteer non-profit organization, is looking for more volunteers to help keep up and improve the region’s trail system, which includes more than 75 miles of walking paths and hiking trails that cross Sunapee, Ragged and Kearsarge mountains and takes in three state forests and four state parks.

The Greenway connects state, town and private lands and gives hikers and walkers access to mountains, lakes, vistas and historical sites across the region.

These trails also connect with other popular hiking areas, such as Mount Monadnock.

Building a Trailworks Community

With organized and advertised events–eight trailwork events in four months–SRKG with support from the Quabbin to Cardigan Partnership hope to grow and strengthen the area’s trailwork community.

Each event will focus on specific improvements to local trails and teach trailwork skills to new volunteers.

The trailwork campaign will also help spread the word about the area’s trails, organizations and conserved lands, which are part of a larger landscape, the Q2C (Quabbin to Cardigan) region.

Volunteers Needed

On Tuesday, July 23, trailwork volunteers have three “help and learn” opportunities: easy, moderate and difficult.

  • Sunapee, Upper Sunapee Village to North Road (Easy) – Blaze a trail: Paint and plastic blazes show the way. To volunteer, contact Lisa Correa (c.lisa7716@gmail.com).
  • Goshen, Lower Summit Trail, Mount Sunapee State Park (Moderate) – Clean a waterbar: Rakes, shovels and a short walk in. Contact Dave Coulter (603-934-0148 )
  • Andover, Ragged Mountain from Proctor Academy (Difficult) – Move a trail requiring a 1.5 mile hike uphill with tools. Contact Gerry Gold (603-526-2857 or geecubed@yahoo.com)

Trailwork is also planned for July 24-26. The Student Conservation Association high school trail crew will be working on the Barlow Trail on Mount Kearsarge at Winslow State Park in Wilmot.  Also, SCA will do trailwork on July 28-31.

Increasing use of highland trails

The highland trails in the region’s state parks, such as on Mount Sunapee and on Mount Kearsarge in Winslow State Park, are seeing ever-increasing traffic including use by large groups that meet up to hike, explained Gold.

With the internet and on-line networking and easy access to information, the area is no longer a secret. The well-publicized areas are seeing many more hikers (of varying experience). More use means more wear and tear to the trails and the need for more trail maintenance.

Also, when new hiking opportunities open up with new or expanded land conservation, the call for experienced trail crews increases.

Ideally, a perfect trail crew member is someone who works on their favorite trails and pathways, Gold added.  However, “even if we only need three or four people on a given day, it may take an email list of 100 to find those people ready and able on that day.”

To learn more about joining the area’s Trailwork Community. Email trails@srkg.com.

For information about the Greenway, including SRKG membership ($10/yr), the SRKG Guide, and volunteer opportunities, visit www.srkg.com or email srkgc@srkg.com.

Phillips Preserve protects 71 acres on Goose Hole Road

Phillips Preserve NL NHNew London, NH — With support from New London voters and the town’s Conservation Commission, the Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust in June, 2013, added the Phillips Preserve to its list of protected lands in the Kearsarge/Sunapee region.

The 71-acre Phillips Preserve easement, on Goose Hole Road in New London, is owned by the town and managed by the New London Conservation Commission.

The property has over 1,600 feet of frontage on Otter Pond and over 700 feet of frontage on Otter Pond Brook, which flows from Goose Hole Pond into Otter Pond.

The Phillips Preserve is open to the public for low impact recreation, offering significant trails on the property. The easement, managed for timber production, had a recent timber cut on the property that created a substantial view of Mount Sunapee.

At the 2012 Town Meeting, the voters of New London voted unanimously to place a conservation easement on the property.

In 1980, as a memorial to her husband, Stephen, summer resident Bessie Wright Phillips of Salem, Massachusetts, gifted these 71 acres on Otter Pond to the Town of New London.

In the fall of 1993, Mrs. Phillips was recognized nationally for her 7,000-acre donation in the Rangeley Lakes region of Maine.

Prior to her death in 1996, Mrs. Phillips granted easements on her five New London properties on Burpee Hill Road, Little Lake Sunapee and Route 103A, which benefits all that enjoy the regional landscape.

Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet to host Sailing Day

SunapeeSailingFleet

The Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet will host its 2nd Annual Lake Sunapee Sailing Day on Saturday, July 13. Courtesy photo.

Sunapee, NH – The Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet is hosting its 2nd Annual Lake Sunapee Sailing Day on Saturday, July 13, to promote sailing fun on Lake Sunapee. All sailboats from sunfish to cruisers to racers are welcome to join a “Poker Cruise.”

The “Poker Cruise”

Sailboats are invited to rendezvous at the Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet Committee Boat just outside Sunapee Harbor at 1 p.m.

At the Committee Boat each sailboat will receive a map of the course and instructions.

Boats will sail to four marks and back to the Committee Boat. At each mark and the Committee Boat each boat will receive a playing card. The Committee Boat and four power boats anchored at the four marks will be adorned with balloons and easy to locate.

Following the cruise, each crew is invited to bring their “poker hand” to a reception sponsored by the Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet at Pete’s Shed at Sunapee Harbor from 4 to 6 p.m. There will be food and refreshments. Prizes will go to the best “poker hands” and best themed crew costumes.

The Lake Sunapee Cruising Fleet is a non-profit, volunteer organization dedicated to the sport of sailboat racing on Lake Sunapee and creating friendships. It has been in existence since 1984.

All participating sailboats must meet all vessel requirements as outlined in the Boater’s Guide of New Hampshire. The weather day is Sunday, July 14.

To participate with your sailboat or to get more information, contact Fleet Captain Bill Ames at 603-763-4868 or e-mail lake.sunapee.cruising.fleet@gmail.com.

Sunapee dedicates Herbert Welsh Trail on July 6

WelshTrailMapSunapee, NH — On  Saturday, July 6, at 2 p.m., Sunapee will dedicate a new hiking trail that honors Herbert Welsh (1851‐1941), the little‐known leader of land conservation efforts in the Sunapee Region.

The Sunapee Conservation Commission and Sunapee Historical Society, the event sponsors, invite the public to attend.

The dedication will be held along the marsh shore, a short walk in from the road. A hike to the top of Garnet Hill will follow the dedication.  Meet at the trail head parking area near intersection of Jobs Creek Road and Garnet Hill Road.

The Herbert Welsh Trail adds public hiking access to more of the town’s conservation land at Dewey Woods, including the Rogers Brook Marsh and the top of Garnet Hill. The trail was designed and completed last year.

Nature Art Walk

From July 1 to August 31, 2013, the trail will be marked with more than 30 images of historical Sunapee landscapes connected to Dewey Woods, Garnet Hill and Lake Sunapee, as well as Herbert Welsh’s art. The images will also be on display at the Sunapee Historical Society Museum at Sunapee Harbor.

“These historical images tell a story of the evolution of our landscape since 1900 and bring together a display of some of his paintings, many with Sunapee connections,” says Barbara Chalmers, Sunapee, who led the effort to create the Herbert Welsh Trail and the Nature Art Walk.

“Welsh was THE advocate and leader of conservation efforts for Mount Sunapee and the Dewey Woods,” says Chalmers.

The walking crusader Herbert Welsh (1851-1941). Image from his book The New Gentleman of the Road, which chronciled his 450-mile treks from Philadelphia to Sunapee.

The walking crusader Herbert Welsh (1851-1941). Image from his book “The New Gentleman of the Road” that describes his 450-mile treks from Philadelphia to Sunapee.

“A truly renaissance man, Welsh was an artist by training, writer, publisher, conservationist and civil rights advocate. He devoted his life to a variety of causes to aid others less fortunate and to conserve beautiful lands for the enjoyment of future generations.”

Welsh was a founder of the Indian Rights Association, which for 110 years advocated for the American Indian, the International Arbitration Commission, a forerunner of the World Court, the National Municipal League, which still exists today.

He met with three U.S. Presidents regarding Indian rights, civil service reform and good government policies, and in 1892, rode horseback through the Dakota Sioux Reservation with Teddy Roosevelt.

Welsh also was the founder of the Sunapee Chapter of the Society for Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

The Walking Crusader

For many years, beginning at age 64, Welsh walked each June from his home in Philadelphia to Sunapee, then back in early fall.

His last ambitious project, in 1929, was to raise funds to build a conference center on land he had bought in Vermont for men and women of all faiths and cultures to meet and discuss the important societal concerns of the day. His dream went unrealized with the Great Depression of the 1930s, explains Chalmers.

Chalmers began researching Welsh’s life a few years back for the 2011 Mount Sunapee Centennial Celebration. She was amazed at what she discovered.

“He was so ahead of his time. His societal concerns became his life’s work: economic and social justice for the American Indian,  fighting corruption in government and the civil service, and land preservation for future generations.  Welsh not only led the effort to conserve land on Mount Sunapee, but he was responsible for conserving Dewey Woods too.”

Among the images along the Nature Art Walk is this “penny postcard” view from 1916: Garnet Hill looking across the lake to Mount Sunapee.

Penny Postcard Garnet Hill to Mt Sunapee

Related articles: New hiking trail in Sunapee honors Herbert Welsh (SunapeeNews.com)

Community clean up in Sunapee is May 4

 

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