Sunapee Historical Society Museum to hold Open House

Sunapee Historical Society MuseumSunapee, N.H.– Have you ever wondered what is in the large gray shed opposite the Anchorage in Sunapee Harbor? It’s the Sunapee Historical Society Museum and its directors would like to show you what is there during a special Open House on Sunday, July 27 from 4 to 7 p.m.

The directors will be giving tours explaining some of the items in the collection and their vision for taking better care of some of it. Also, they’ll be running the equipment from the machine shop that serviced the Woodsum steamboats and serving refreshments. Everyone is welcome.

The museum’s regular hours during July and August: Open afternoons 1-4 on Tuesdays, Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays and on Wednesday evenings, 7-9.  Closed on Mondays.  Admission is free, though donations are always welcome.

Free programs at the museum coming up:

  •  July 24, 7 p.m.: A Magic Lantern Show featuring slides from the collection.
  •  August 7, 7 p.m.: Woodbine Dessert Night with refreshments from the cookbook.
  •  August 21, 7 p.m.:  The Wooden Launches of Lake Sunapee.
For more information, email sunapeehistory@gmail.com or call 603-763-8809.

June Jam on June 21 at Muster Field Farm Museum

MMCrowdGatheringNorth Sutton, N.H. –  On June 21, Muster Field Farm, on Harvey Road, will host its 12th annual musical fundraiser. This all-volunteer event, musicians included, helps support the historic farm and serves as a venue for the region’s musical talent, both up-and- coming and tried-and-true!

This year’s line-up includes Gary Robinson, Click Horning Band, Neptune’s Car, Decatur Creek, Mo’Combo, and Night Kitchen.

Enjoy burgers, hot dogs, snacks and beverages (proceeds from food sales also benefit the farm), or pack your own picnic and beverages to enjoy.

Gates open at 3:30, music begins at 4:00. Tickets: $15 per person (children 14 and under are free), available on site the day of the event.

Info and directions: 603-927-4276 or www.musterfieldfarm.com.

Learn about MV Kearsarge restoration

MVK_CC6Sunapee, N.H. — The Sunapee Gardeners invites the public to a presentation by Tim Fenton about the history, sinking and restoration of the MV Kearsarge. The program will be held on Tuesday, June 10, at 7 p.m., at the Knowlton House, 63 Main Street, Sunapee Harbor.

The Fenton family operates both the MV Kearsarge, a restaurant boat, and its sister ship, the MV Mt. Sunapee II, a tour boat. The boats run out of Sunapee Harbor.

The Kearsarge partially sank while moored at the Sunapee Town Dock in January 2013. After a complete renovation— four months of work—the popular dinner boat was back in service cruising Lake Sunapee.

Photo from January 2013 by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee, N.H.

 

 

Two guided tours of the Hay Estate offered in June

The Fells 013Newbury, N.H. – The Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests and The Fells Historic Estate and Gardens are co-sponsoring two historical walks, called “The Hidden History of the Hay Estate,” on Wednesday, June 4, and Wednesday, June 18, from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Hay Forest Reservation in Newbury.

Both walks will be guided by Dave Anderson, the director of education for the Society for the Protection of N.H. Forests.

Participants of the June 4 walk will examine evidence suggesting what the Hay estate was like during the era of Clarence L. Hay. Walkers will stop at the cement cistern that fed water to The Fells, see the ruins of a sugarhouse, visit the Milton Clark/Nathan Baker farm cellar complex – the last and most expensive parcel purchased by statesman John Milton Hay, secretary to Pres. Abe Lincoln — and walk along the “Old Farm Road Trail” to see the Sarah Bartlett cellar-hole. Walking distance is about two miles.

Participants of the June 18 walk will discover how the Hay family and workers on the estate experienced The Fells from evidence and artifacts that are hidden in plain sight. They’ll tour the “Coach Road Trail” (the historic road used by the Hays to access a favorite picnic spot on Sunset Hill); a unique swath of forest that hosted hurricane salvage operations along Lake Sunapee; the ruins of a water pumping shed; and the site of the former swimming dock located south of the mouth of Beech Brook. Walking distance is estimated to be 1.5 miles.

Attendance at Part 2 is not contingent upon attendance at Part 1. The cost is $5 for each walk. These events, which start at The Fells Welcome Kiosk, are supported by grants from the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation’s Wellborn Ecology Fund and the Creekmore and Adele Fath Charitable Foundation.

To register, call 603-763-4789 x3.

Founded in 1901, the Society for the Protection of New Hampshire Forests is the state’s oldest and largest non-profit land conservation organization. Supported by 10,000 families and businesses, the Forest Society’s mission is to perpetuate the state’s forests by promoting land conservation and sustainable forestry. The organization owns 50,000 conserved acres of land in New Hampshire and holds conservation easements on another 115,000 acres.

 

 

 

 

Historical Society program: Notable Women of Sunapee

SunapeeHistoricalSocietySunapee, N.H. — The Sunapee Historical Society will host its spring program—Notable Women of Sunapee—on Wednesday evening, April 30, at 7 p.m. at the Lake Sunapee United Methodist Church, Lower Main Street at Route 11, Sunapee. Everyone is welcome at this free event; refreshments will be served.

Ron Garceau will show photos and lead a discussion recalling the contributions of several memorable women from Sunapee’s past. Come and learn or share your memories. Garceau is well-known around the Sunapee area as the publisher of SooNipi Magazine and past president of the Sunapee Historical Society.

The spring program will be a precursor for a homemaker’s exhibit at the Sunapee Historical Society Museum, 74 Main Street, Sunapee Harbor, and a summer program on women’s organizations. woodbinecottage

Other summer programs will be about the Woodbine Cottage and the wooden launches that used to frequent Lake Sunapee.

The museum will reopen (weekends only, 1-4 p.m., through June) on May 24.

The Sunapee Historical Society is a non-profit organization that strives to preserve and promote Sunapee’s varied history. For more information, contact the Society’s President, Becky Rylander, at 603-763-8809 or sunapeehistory@gmail.com.

Muster Field Farm Museum to hold Ice Harvest Day Jan. 26

IceHarvesting_MFFM

Photo by Gretchen Gudefin.

North Sutton, N.H. — It soon will be ice harvesting time, when families gather, bundle up and share a New England tradition at Kezar Lake and Muster Field Farm Museum.

The farm will hold its annual Ice Harvest Day at Horse Beach in North Sutton on Sunday, January 26, 2014, from 9 a.m. until the ice is in.

Help cut ice blocks from the lake for delivery up to the farm.

Using an ice block fulcrum, volunteers will load the ice blocks onto wagons and vehicles then haul it to the farm’s Ice House, where it will be stacked for use at  summer events.

The farm’s Ryder Corner School House will be warm and welcoming, serving  homemade desserts and hot beverages.

Pete Lauridsen and friends will display antique cars converted to snowmobiles at the farm and the Sutton Ridgerunners will stage an Ice Day ride-in for all area snowmobilers. Free admission (donations appreciated).  Rain date: February 2.

For more information and directions: 603-926-4276 or www.musterfieldfarm.com.

Sutton Historical Society Pancake Breakfast

Warm up beforehand at the fifth annual pancake breakfast sponsored by the Sutton Historical Society, in North Sutton’s Free Will Baptist Church, from 7 to 10 a.m. Enjoy all-you-can-eat plain or blueberry pancakes, local maple syrup, sausage, orange juice, coffee, tea, or hot chocolate.  Cost: $6.00 for adults, $3.00 for kids.  A $1.00 discount if you come by snowmobile, x-c skis or snowshoes. Rain date: February 2.

Sunapee Seniors: Wacky Songs That Made Us Laugh

Sunapee, N.H. — Calvin Knickerbocker will present “Wacky Songs That Made Us Laugh” on Monday, October 28 at 1 p.m. at the Sunapee Methodist Church, Lower Main Street. The program, sponsored by the Sunapee Seniors and the New Hampshire Humanities Council, is open to all free of charge.

Knickerbocker is an independent scholar who developed and delivered a dozen courses on American musical history at Rivier University. He has presented programs in retirement communities, senior centers and other venues in New Hampshire and New York.

“Popular songs with humorous lyrics have kept us laughing since Colonial times. We need comic relief and songs provide some of the best (sometimes unintentionally),” the program release says. “Excerpts from hilarious songs help chart the evolution of musical humor from the 1920’s to the 1980’s.  Selections poke fun at WW II enemies, diets, television, sex, summer camp, religion, and many other aspects of life.”

The Sunapee Seniors is a non-profit organization, formed in 1982 and open to all senior citizens (55 or over) who live in Sunapee and neighboring communities. Meetings are held twice monthly, with a July and August recess, and usually on the second and fourth Mondays of the month, at 1 p.m. at the Sunapee United Methodist Church.

Nancy Clark is current president of the group and Joe Internicola, program coordinator.

Celebrate the summer harvest at Muster Field Farm

Musterfield Farm photo

North Sutton, N.H. — Harvest Day at Muster Field Farm Museum celebrates the summer’s harvest. It is a time to enjoy the beauty of the farm and reap the benefits of the growing season.

Harvest Day at Muster Field Farm Museum is on Sunday, October 6, 2013, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m. Open to all free of charge.

The museum represents the agricultural traditions of rural New Hampshire. Its historic buildings and working farm are located on 250 acres on Harvey Road in North Sutton.

Harvest Day includes guided tours of the Matthew Harvey Homestead (1 to 4 p.m.), live music in the Pillsbury Barn (12 to 3 p.m.), hayrides, storytelling, and old-time games for all to enjoy.

Visitors can enjoy a variety of craft demonstrations: spinning, blacksmithing, basket making, cider making, lace making, rug hooking and more.

A warm meal of homemade soups, fresh bread and cider will be available for purchase in the Pillsbury Barn and fresh produce will be for sale in the farm stand. The apples are delicious and plentiful.

For Info and directions call 603-927-4276 or visit www.musterfieldfarm.com.

Courtesy photo.

Muster Field Farm will celebrate Farm Days

Muster Field sunflowers and barnNorth Sutton, N.H. — Muster Field Farm announcement — The August Farm Days Celebration at Muster Field Farm Museum in North Sutton will be held Saturday and Sunday, August 24 and 25, 2013.

Enjoy the museum’s largest event of the year, a two-‐day celebration of all things agricultural, historical, and farm-related: blacksmithing, basket making, weaving, rug braiding, square dancing and much more!

Explore an extensive display of antique tractors and trucks while children enjoy free hayrides and homemade ice cream. Cheer on the Grande Parade of antique vehicles each day at 3:00 and take your chances at Cow Flop Bingo on Saturday at 4:00. Don’t miss the famous roast beef supper Saturday from 5-7 p.m. in the Hardy-Pillsbury Barn. Tickets for the supper are $10 for adults and $5 for children, available by reservation (603‐927‐4440), or at the Farm Days information booth.

As always, fresh Muster Field Farm grown vegetables are available in the farm stand.

Farm Days hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., rain or shine. General admission is $5; free for members and for children 6 and under. Information and directions: 603-927-4276 or 603-927-4440, and at http://www.musterfieldfarm.com.

Sunapee’s Hames Park, a gem along the Sugar River, tells of times past

HamesParksign2013_CCSunapee, N.H. — A small park, a gem along the Sugar River in Sunapee Harbor village tells of times past.

The park’s pathway, off Main Street near the High Street Bridge, leads down into a garden and granite lined sanctuary that speaks to the power of its townspeople and the river.

In the late 1800s, many New Hampshire’s riverfront villages and towns bustled with industry and business. At the turn of the century, the Granite State was a leading producer of textiles, machinery, wood products, and paper.

In Sunapee, factories harnessed the river for power and employed a variety of workers in its shops, mills and foundries along upper and lower Main Street.

Hames Park, dedicated in 1990, details the history of hame production in Sunapee.

HamesParkwalk2013_CCA hame, made of wood or metal, is the curved part of a harness that fits around the neck of a draft animal and to which the traces (or lines) are attached.

The Sunapee Historical Society Museum at Sunapee Harbor displays wooden and metal hames and other locally manufactured items from more than a century ago.

A sign at Hames Park talks about industry along the river.

From Lake Sunapee for a distance of nearly two miles, the Sugar River has a rapid descent and this furnished some of the finest water power in the state. On this particular section of the river, there were many factories. Along with hames (which were made on this site) many other goods were manufactured: fork & hoe handles, clothes pins, paper, lumber, tanned leather, meal & flour, sashes & blinds, shoe pegs, starch, inner soles, shingles, splits and excelsior.

Hames manufacturing was big business 

The hame business in Sunapee started in 1860. Ownership changed over time as did its factory buildings that burned and were rebuilt and expanded.

Sunapee’s hame production was big business. In 1893, it turned out about 600 pair of hames per day. In 1899, the U.S. Hame Company of Buffalo, N.Y., took over the Sunapee plant.

However, with the development of the automobile and internal combustion engine that transformed transportation across the country, the demand for hames dropped and the plant closed in 1914.

More than a century ago, industry and businesses lined the river. The hame company, as did other businesses, had buildings that spanned the river.

The center of Sunapee was in the harbor village around the Hames Park area, where Central, Main and High streets came together, and where one found the essentials: post office, livery, library and shops.

The Sunapee Riverwalk, a scenic half-mile walk from the harbor to the town office building and information booth on Route 11, passes the falls at Hames Park and other historic sites along the Sugar River. Visit the park via the RIverwalk by crossing the High Street Bridge.

HamesParkbench2013_CB

Garden and granite lined Hames Park in Sunapee Harbor Village tells the history of local manufacturing along the Sugar River, where the power of the townspeople and the river came together. (Photos of Hames Park sign and walkway by Charlotte Carlson, Sunapee.)

Sunapee dedicates Herbert Welsh Trail on July 6

WelshTrailMapSunapee, NH — On  Saturday, July 6, at 2 p.m., Sunapee will dedicate a new hiking trail that honors Herbert Welsh (1851‐1941), the little‐known leader of land conservation efforts in the Sunapee Region.

The Sunapee Conservation Commission and Sunapee Historical Society, the event sponsors, invite the public to attend.

The dedication will be held along the marsh shore, a short walk in from the road. A hike to the top of Garnet Hill will follow the dedication.  Meet at the trail head parking area near intersection of Jobs Creek Road and Garnet Hill Road.

The Herbert Welsh Trail adds public hiking access to more of the town’s conservation land at Dewey Woods, including the Rogers Brook Marsh and the top of Garnet Hill. The trail was designed and completed last year.

Nature Art Walk

From July 1 to August 31, 2013, the trail will be marked with more than 30 images of historical Sunapee landscapes connected to Dewey Woods, Garnet Hill and Lake Sunapee, as well as Herbert Welsh’s art. The images will also be on display at the Sunapee Historical Society Museum at Sunapee Harbor.

“These historical images tell a story of the evolution of our landscape since 1900 and bring together a display of some of his paintings, many with Sunapee connections,” says Barbara Chalmers, Sunapee, who led the effort to create the Herbert Welsh Trail and the Nature Art Walk.

“Welsh was THE advocate and leader of conservation efforts for Mount Sunapee and the Dewey Woods,” says Chalmers.

The walking crusader Herbert Welsh (1851-1941). Image from his book The New Gentleman of the Road, which chronciled his 450-mile treks from Philadelphia to Sunapee.

The walking crusader Herbert Welsh (1851-1941). Image from his book “The New Gentleman of the Road” that describes his 450-mile treks from Philadelphia to Sunapee.

“A truly renaissance man, Welsh was an artist by training, writer, publisher, conservationist and civil rights advocate. He devoted his life to a variety of causes to aid others less fortunate and to conserve beautiful lands for the enjoyment of future generations.”

Welsh was a founder of the Indian Rights Association, which for 110 years advocated for the American Indian, the International Arbitration Commission, a forerunner of the World Court, the National Municipal League, which still exists today.

He met with three U.S. Presidents regarding Indian rights, civil service reform and good government policies, and in 1892, rode horseback through the Dakota Sioux Reservation with Teddy Roosevelt.

Welsh also was the founder of the Sunapee Chapter of the Society for Protection of New Hampshire Forests.

The Walking Crusader

For many years, beginning at age 64, Welsh walked each June from his home in Philadelphia to Sunapee, then back in early fall.

His last ambitious project, in 1929, was to raise funds to build a conference center on land he had bought in Vermont for men and women of all faiths and cultures to meet and discuss the important societal concerns of the day. His dream went unrealized with the Great Depression of the 1930s, explains Chalmers.

Chalmers began researching Welsh’s life a few years back for the 2011 Mount Sunapee Centennial Celebration. She was amazed at what she discovered.

“He was so ahead of his time. His societal concerns became his life’s work: economic and social justice for the American Indian,  fighting corruption in government and the civil service, and land preservation for future generations.  Welsh not only led the effort to conserve land on Mount Sunapee, but he was responsible for conserving Dewey Woods too.”

Among the images along the Nature Art Walk is this “penny postcard” view from 1916: Garnet Hill looking across the lake to Mount Sunapee.

Penny Postcard Garnet Hill to Mt Sunapee

Related articles: New hiking trail in Sunapee honors Herbert Welsh (SunapeeNews.com)

‘Ice out’ on Lake Sunapee

Ice Out Day on Lake Sunapee was Thursday, April 18, 2013. In the morning, a mass of  ice blocked boat passage north to south on the lake. However, the ice was gone by 2:30 that afternoon. "Ice out" is determined when a boat is able to navigate the length of the lake from Georges Mills to Newbury. Photo by Charleen Osborne, Sunapee.

Ice Out Day on Lake Sunapee was Thursday, April 18, 2013. In the morning, a mass of ice blocked boat passage north to south on the lake. However, the ice was gone by 2:30 that afternoon. “Ice out” is determined when a boat is able to navigate the length of the lake from Georges Mills to Newbury. Photo by Charleen Osborne, Sunapee.

Sunapee, N.H. — “Ice out” on Lake Sunapee was declared on Thursday, April 18, 2013.

Ice blocked boat passage from north to south at the islands at 8 a.m. By 2:30 p.m. the ice mass was gone and “Ice Out” was called by Richard Osborne and his family.

“Ice out” is determined when a boat is able to navigate the length of the lake from Georges Mills to Newbury.

See earlier “ice out” dates via the town website: Lake Sunapee Ice Out Chart.

MV Kearsarge and Steamboat Kearsarge “Sunk in Ice”

Kearsarge photos_SHSLake Sunapee, N.H. – The similar look of being sunk in ice. The MV Kearsarge (left) sank into the ice on Lake Sunapee in January 2013, and the steamboat Kearsarge (shown in the photo on the right) had a similar experience… some 80 years ago.

The old photo (on the right) reads: “Steamboat Kearsarge, Sunk in ice near Davis Cabins, Lake Sunapee – Circa 1933?, Sunapee Historical Society Collection.”

Photos courtesy of the Sunapee Historical Society and local historian Ron Garceau.

Look for these photos in the March 2013 issue of SooNipi Magazine.

Read related articles:

MV Kearsarge is afloat! (SunapeeNews.com)

MV Kearsarge back afloat after small hole detected (UnionLeader.com)

Sunapee Historical Society: Winter newsletter previews summer projects

SunapeeHistoricalSocietyAlthough the Sunapee Historical Society Museum at Sunapee Harbor is closed during winter, members are open for business researching and seeking out information for the Society’s summer projects.

In the recently published SHS Winter 2013 newsletter, President Becky Fitts Rylander previewed each of these programs:

  • A program on summer camps. This will be done in conjunction with our friends in other towns, coordinated through PALS (our Partners Around Lake Sunapee). Each town will focus on camps that operated within its boundaries. If you have any information about or photos of Camp Sunapee (a boy’s camp on Lake Ave. 100 years ago), please let us know. We have a photo and brochure for Camp Manauke, a girl’s camp on Star Island in the 1920s, but would welcome more. Any others?
  • Industries along the Sugar River. With a new pedestrian bridge being built in the spring behind the Harbor House Livery, we think this year will be a good time to explore all the industries that lined the river between the Harbor and Coffin Park. That area looked quite different a century ago. We have some information and photos, but would welcome more.
  • The old information booth. Despite our best intentions last summer, this 1929 vintage building still needs to be restored—and we still need help to get that done. If carpentry is up your alley, please let us know.

To volunteer or exchange information, email sunapeehistory@gmail.com.

To download/view the Winter 2013 newsletter, visit the Society’s website: www.sunapeehistoricalsociety.org. A membership form is also posted on the website.

Archaeologist to speak at Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum

Warner, N.H. – Dr. Robert G. Goodby, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Franklin Pierce University in Rindge, will share his latest research at the Mt. Kearsarge Indian Museum’s Annual Meeting on January 19.  Goodby’s presentation is titled “Tenant Swamp:   A Late Ice Age Site in Keene, NH.”  It will begin at 12:45pm and is open to the public free of charge. Continue reading

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