Sunapee Green-Up Day set for May 3

Sunapee, N.H. — Sunapee Green-Up Day is coming up. Volunteers are needed for this annual road-side clean up set for Saturday, May 3, 2014, from 9 a.m. to noon. The raindate is Sunday, May 4.

Green-Up Day is a tradition in town. Family and friends turn out and pick up roadside litter town wide. The volunteers then gather at noon at Sunapee Harbor for a picnic that is sponsored by local businesses and organizations.

Volunteer forms are available at Abbott Library and the Sunapee Town Office building, Edgemont Road, and on the event website.

Participants are asked to bring their completed form to the sign-in at the Safety Services Building, 9 Sargent Road, at 9 a.m. on the morning of the event to get a clean up area assignment. The form asks where you would like to participate. For reference, see the Green-Up Day Maps link, and click here for the Volunteer Form.

 

Upper Valley Naturalist Training Registration Now Open

UVLT Naturalist Training-walk in the woodsUpper Valley, N.H. — The Upper Valley Land Trust and Hulbert Outdoor Center are sponsoring an Upper Valley Naturalist Training from April 23-May 17, 2013.

The Upper Valley Naturalist Training program is an in-depth introduction to the ecosystems and wildlife found in the Upper Valley region of Vermont and New Hampshire.

The training is designed to be accessible for the beginning naturalist, but also of interest to more seasoned naturalists, particularly those looking for a way to share their knowledge with the larger community.

The training will include four Wednesday evening classroom presentations and four Saturday field sessions.

Topics will be presented by local experts and include geology, plant communities, wetland ecology, birds, interpretive techniques and more. Space is limited, so interested participants should register now.

For more information and the training schedule, visit www.uvlt.org or call 603-643-6626.

Community bike tune-up and swap held in New London

Geordie Sousa ’13, of Colby-Sawyer College and the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative, was one of the volunteer “mechanics” at the Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap on May 4th.  Together with Professor Harvey Pine and fellow student Doug Foley ’15, they estimate they tuned-up 35 bikes.

Geordie Sousa ’13, of Colby-Sawyer College and the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative, was one of the volunteer “mechanics” at the Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap on May 4th. Together with Professor Harvey Pine and fellow student Doug Foley ’15, they estimate they tuned-up 35 bikes. Courtesy photo.

New London, N.H. – On the New London Town Green on May 4, the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative (KVTI) hosted a successful Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap that may become an annual KVTI event.

The bike tune-up and exchange was made possible through partnerships and support from Colby-Sawyer College, the New London Police Department, Pizza Chef, Hole in the Fence Café, Arctic Dreams and Village Sports.

On a sunny Saturday afternoon KVTI members distributed coupons contributed by Arctic Dreams, Hole in the Fence Café and Pizza Chef to the 20 community members who donated bikes.  Those members also facilitated 12 swaps for people who brought in smaller bikes and “traded-up” for a larger size, and eight other people went home with a “new” bike.

In addition, three volunteer mechanics were on hand to offer free tune-ups and advice. Professor Harvey Pine from Colby-Sawyer College and students Geordie Sousa ’13 and Doug Foley ’15 worked on approximately 35 bicycles throughout the day.

Two New London Police Department officers, Patrolman Eben Lamson and Detective Tom Anderson, distributed free helmets, and John Kiernan from Village Sports sized the helmets and was on-hand to provided additional technical assistance and equipment as needed.

Candis Whitney from the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative welcomes participants to the Community Bike Tune-Up and Swap as they enter the donation area on the New London Town Green. Over 20 bicycles were donated on the May 4 event.

Live music was provided by Ben Dobrowski, co-owner of Greenhill Collective Farm in Sutton, N.H.

Bikes that were not claimed by the end of the day were donated to local children and to Colby-Sawyer’s Chargers Stable, a free bike-share program for students.

The Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative encourages the nine towns in the Kearsarge Valley to develop a greater reliance on local resources – food, energy and human resources in particular – to address the impacts of global issues such as economic insecurity, environmental instabilities, and dependence on non-renewable energy.  Its members include Colby-Sawyer College students, faculty and staff, as well as residents from surrounding communities.

For more information visit the KVTI blog or www.meetup.com/transition-Kearsarge.

 

Sunapee Green-Up Day is May 4, 2013

greenupday artSunapee Green-Up Day is Saturday, May 4, 2013.

Local families and individuals are invited to turn out from 8:30 a.m. to noon to clean up road-side litter. This is an annual event in Sunapee and includes a picnic at Sunapee Harbor for the volunteers.

To join the clean-up, complete the volunteer form available at the town office building and library and online at: www.sunapeegreenupday.com. The website also provides safety tips, road maps and neighborhood captains.

Participants will pick up bags at the May 4 check-in held at the Sunapee Safety Services Building, Sargent Road, from 8:30 to 9:00 a.m. And if you would like to clean up your neighborhood before the 4th, call Rose Batts at 603-763-4920.

Capture the heat: Workshop on geothermal energy for the home

Logo of the Geothermal Energy Association.Experts to describe ‘the magic of geothermal heating/cooling’ at free workshop in Andover, New Hampshire

Andover, N.H. — A workshop on residential geothermal energy systems, which capture the nearly constant 50-60-degree (f) temperature trapped below the earth’s surface and use it to heat and cool the home, will be offered by two local experts on Saturday, April 6, in Andover, New Hampshire. The program will be held at the Andover Town Hall meeting room, Main Street, from 10 a.m. to noon.

The workshop is open to the public at no charge and is the second in a series sponsored by the Andover Energy Group, a local organization of volunteers. The first, held in February and focusing on solar energy, attracted over 80 attendees.

Leading the workshop will be Dan Grace of Dunbarton, whose Capital Well Clean Water Center is described as “one of New Hampshire’s most experienced geothermal well installers,” and Bill Wenzel, head of a Merrimack heating and air-conditioning business that bears his name. Wenzel is a certified installer for the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association, a non-profit organization established to advance geothermal heat pump technology.

Experienced in team presentations, Grace and Wenzel will offer an illustrated “Geothermal 101” session describing “the magic that is geothermal heating and cooling,” and answering questions. Refreshments and handout materials will be available..

Advance registration is encouraged but not required. For more information and to register, e-mail Maria Glorioso at glorioso@tds.net or call 603-735-6128.

Established in 2011, the Andover Energy Group has offered several public workshops and an “energy awareness day” featuring guided tours of local homes using alternative energy sources. It also oversees local distribution of the Green Energy Times, a bi-monthly newspaper devoted to clean energy. A workshop on home weatherization and another on financing alternative-energy installations are tentatively planned for later in the spring.

UVLT offers training for naturalists

Green Leaf

The Upper Valley Land Trust and Hulbert Outdoor Center are sponsoring an Upper Valley Naturalist Training from April 23 to May 19, 2013.

The training is designed to be accessible for the beginning naturalist, but also of interest to more seasoned naturalists, particularly those looking for a way to share their knowledge with the larger community.

The Upper Valley Naturalist Training program is an in-depth introduction to the ecosystems and wildlife found in the Upper Valley region of Vermont and New Hampshire.

The training will include four evening classroom presentations and four weekend field sessions. Topics will be presented by local experts and include geology, plant communities, wetland ecology, birds, interpretive techniques and more.

Space is limited, so interested participants should register early. For more information and the training schedule, visit www.uvlt.org or call 603-643-6626

An invite to Kearsarge Valley Going Local

Tina Clarke

Transition Trainer Tina Clarke will be the guest speaker at Kearsarge Valley Going Local, a community-wide gathering to be held on the campus of Colby-Sawyer College, New London, on Saturday, March 30, from noon to 5 p.m. The public is invited to attend.

New London, N.H. — A community-wide gathering to build self-reliance and resilience, while promoting sustainability and enhancing quality of life in the Kearsarge Valley Region, will be hosted in the Ware Campus/Student Center on the Colby-Sawyer College campus in New London on Saturday, March 30, from noon to 5 p.m.

The event—Kearsarge Valley Going Local: Local Food, Local Business, Local Skills— is organized by the Kearsarge Valley Transition Initiative Task Force and students in the Environmental Studies Community-Based Research Project class.

The public is invited to attend.

Organizers want to draw upon the ideas, skills and experiences of area residents to develop positive localized solutions to discuss the regional impacts of larger global issues such as economic insecurity, environmental instabilities, and dependence on non-renewable energy.

The day will begin with an optional brunch (noon to 1:00 p.m.) that will feature live music from one of the area’s favorite folk artists, Click Horning. Brunch is $6 for adults, $3 for children.

The activities to follow will offer opportunities to find shared interests, to learn about local resources, to network share contact information, and to develop practical strategies that can be implemented in the Kearsarge Valley.

The overall direction and focus for the day will also be guided by participants’ own ideas and strategies for:

  • sustaining health and well-being,
  • creating a strong regional food system,
  • supporting a vibrant local economy and
  • developing more resilience in our region.

To RSVP, recommended but not required, email: transition.town@colby-sawyer.edu or go to Meetup.com Transition-Kearsarge

Certified Transition Trainer Tina Clarke will be the guest speaker. Clarke, of Turner Falls, Massachusetts, has worked with over 120 Transition communities across the country, and has been a trainer, program director and consultant for 25 years, supporting and guiding leaders in over 400 local, national, regional and local organizations.

Turner has directed citizen training programs for 17 national faith communities, and she directed Greenpeace USA’s national citizen Activist Network. She also founded and led campaigns on energy, environmental justice and toxins for New England Clean Water Action.

Most recently she was a consultant with 350.org, the Massachusetts Municipal Association, and the Sustainability Institute.

Turner’s passive solar, Platinum LEED, low-toxic, largely locally-built “Power House” won the Massachusetts utility company-sponsored competition, the Zero Energy Challenge, and the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association’s 2010 Zero Net Energy Award.

To learn more about this event or to RSVP, visit www.meetup.com/Transition-Kearsarge or www.kearsargetransition.com, or call Jenisha Shrestha, 205-482-2699.

How many birds are in your backyard? N.H. Audubon survey is Feb. 9 and 10

 Nuthatch

In a backyard in Sunapee, a Red-breasted Nuthatch finds a special winter treat: a pine cone loaded with suet and seed.

Stock up those bird feeders and dig out your binoculars for New Hampshire Audubon’s Backyard Winter Bird Survey. This annual statewide survey will take place Saturday, February 9, and Sunday, February 10.

Biologists need help from citizens all over the Granite State to get a clear picture of what’s really happening with our winter birds.

Anyone can take part in the Backyard Winter Bird Survey by counting the birds in their own backyard on the survey weekend and reporting on-line or sending the results on a special reporting form to NH Audubon.

Forms are also available at NH Audubon centers in Auburn, Concord and Manchester, and on-line.  at www.nhaudubon.org under the Birding page.

Data from the Backyard Winter Bird Survey is used to track changes in the distribution and abundance of many species. Each year about 1,300 observers across the state count the birds coming to their feeders.

“The strength of the survey is that we can look at trends over the long term,” says Survey Coordinator, Rebecca Suomala. “We now have more than 25 years of data and we can see the patterns of ups and downs in different bird species.”

Last year, there were record numbers of Red-bellied Woodpeckers and near record Carolina Wrens, both southern species that have expanded their ranges northward and are now common on the Survey. Eastern Bluebirds and American Robins were also tallied in record numbers.

“The Survey numbers show these two species increasing since 1997. They used to be harbingers of spring but are now increasingly found all winter, feeding on fruit” says Suomala.

There were 74 species were recorded overall in 2012.

“This year we are expecting high numbers of Common Redpolls, a northern finch that tends to invade New Hampshire every other winter,” according to Dr. Pamela Hunt, Senior Biologist at NH Audubon. Hunt also suggests people watch for Pine Grosbeaks, another periodic winter visitor that feeds on fruit and has been reported in many areas of the state this fall and early winter.

Reports of a lack of birds are just as valuable as reports of many birds.

“If everyone reported only when they have a lot of birds, we wouldn’t be able to see the declines,” says Suomala. The most important thing is to participate each year regardless of how many or how few birds you have. This provides a consistent long-term set of data that shows both the ups and downs.

All New Hampshire residents are encouraged to take part.

Results from past years are on the NH Audubon website.

For more information about the Backyard Winter Bird Survey, please call NH Audubon at 603-224-9909 or go to the web site at www.nhaudubon.org and click on Birding.

Note: There are two bird surveys in February. NH Audubon’s Backyard Winter Bird Survey that takes place in New Hampshire only, and the Great Backyard Bird Count, a nation-wide web-based survey on February 17-20, 2012; www.birdcount.org.

Thinking solar energy? Free workshop to be held in Andover, N.H.

Kearsarge Valley TransitionAre you interested in learning more about solar energy including the technology used and the economics of installing a system in your home or business? Here’s the program for you!

A free informational workshop on solar-energy installations will be held on Saturday, January 12, from 10 a.m. to noon, in Proctor Academy Chapel on the Village Green in Andover, New Hampshire.

For more information, visit the Meet-Up site for Transition Kearsarge.

Transition Kearsarge brings together local people, groups and businesses committed to sustainability and relocalization through community involvement and action.

Stephen Condon from ReVision Energy, a leading installer of solar electric and solar hot-water systems in northern New England, will lead the workshop. He will answer both your general and specific questions and give a tour of the solar electric system at Proctor Academy.

The Andover Energy Group, a local committee of volunteers, is arranging the program.

Lake Sunapee Christmas Bird Count is Dec. 15

CBC MapLake Sunapee Region, N. H. – It is almost time for the Lake Sunapee Christmas Bird Count. The count in our area will take place on Saturday, December 15. Gary Stansfield, Goshen, is the local coordinator.

National Audubon Society sponsors the annual count, which is international in scope. In New Hampshire, 21 counts will be held from December 15 to January 1.

Whether you trek outdoors or count birds from the back window, all can join in. For more info about the Lake Sunapee count, contact Stansfield at inuknh@gmail.com. Click on the map to find other count circles and leaders.

CSC grads to talk about success: Poly-Recovery

New London, N.H. – Colby-Sawyer College graduates Mike Mooney and John Pelech, owners of Poly-Recovery, will return to campus Wednesday, November 28 at  7 p.m. to talk about  success and recycling. The program will be held at the Ivey Science Center, and will be hosted by CSC environmental studies students. The public is invited to attend.

Pelech and Mooney will share information about Poly-Recovery’s 100-mile model that handles waste, from pick up to new product manufacturing, all within 100-miles.

Poly-Recovery, in Portsmouth, N.H, has three goals: to eliminate landfill dumping, to reduce carbon waste, and to sustain both the environment and the local economy.

In 2012, the New Hampshire Business Review explained what success in recycling looks like: Portsmouth firms transform companies’ trash into opportunity.

This community program is part of the outreach underway by Kearsarge Valley Transition, a “local network of individuals, businesses and organizations that are committed to improving the well-being and resilience of our neighbors and communities now and into the future.”

For more info, visit Kearsarge Valley Transition or email: transition.town@colby-sawyer.edu.

New hiking trail in Sunapee honors Herbert Welsh

Through the efforts of Herbert Welsh (1851-1941) both the Mount Sunapee Park lands and the Dewey Woods were conserved for the public. A new trail in the Dewey Woods in Sunapee honors him and provides access to the south side of Rogers Brook Marsh and to the top of Garnet Hill.

Sunapee, N.H. – A new trail in the Dewey Woods in Sunapee honors a pioneer in land conservation: Herbert Welsh (1851-1941). Welsh’s activism and leadership in land protection helped define the regional landscape including treasured acres in Sunapee.

Decades ago Welsh worked to protect the highlands now part of the Mount Sunapee State Park and to secure the Dewey Woods, now Town Forest managed by the Sunapee Conservation Commission.

The Dewey Woods was deeded to the Town of Sunapee in 1928 to “hold, use and manage the said premises for the public use and benefit as a public park and forest reserve forever.”

Barbara Chalmers, Sunapee, suggested the Herbert Welsh trail to the local conservation commission. This was a year ago, and the commission welcomed the idea with enthusiasm.

The walking crusader Herbert Welsh (1851-1941). Image from his book The New Gentleman of the Road, which describes his 450-mile treks from Philadelphia to Sunapee.

“The Welsh Trail idea started back in spring 2011 with the  Mount Sunapee Centennial celebration planning,” said Chalmers, who volunteered to research Herbert Welsh.

“What I discovered… amazed me. He was so ahead of his time. His societal concerns became his life’s work: economic and social justice for the American Indian,  fighting corruption in government and the civil service, and land preservation for future generations.  Welsh not only led the effort to conserve land on Mount Sunapee, but he was responsible for conserving Dewey Woods too.”

“During the Centennial celebration group hike up Mount Sunapee, the morning before Tropical Storm Irene hit, there was discussion of rejuvenating the old trail we were on from the campground to the summit and getting it named the Herbert Welsh trail,” Chalmers said.

“That got me thinking I could do something similar at the Dewey Woods. It seemed like Herbert Welsh was an unsung Sunapee hero.”

Chalmers proposed to the conservation commission a volunteer effort that would layout, cut and mark a hiking trail from the existing trail network at the Dewey Woods to the top of Garnet Hill.

In the 1900s – 1920s, this was a popular hiking destination with its once fabulous views of the lake and Mount Sunapee, Chalmers noted. There are many old penny postcards that depict the views from Garnet Hill.

In June 2012, members of the conservation commission hiked the proposed trail route, made a few adjustments and gave Chalmers the go-head.

In July, Chalmers and three other volunteers, including Herbert Welsh’s great grandson and his great-great grandson, cut the trail, which provides access to the south side of Rogers Brook Marsh and to the top of Garnet Hill.

Trail head signs, also made by Chalmers, help explain Welsh’s remarkable legacy:

Herbert Welsh (1851-1941) dedicated his life to art, land conservation and humanitarian causes.  His impact on the Sunapee area remains today.

In 1882, after a visit to the Pine Ridge Sioux Reservation, Herbert founded the Indian Rights Association, a national organization to promote fair treatment and education for the American Indian which he led for 40 years.

In 1893, Herbert built a summer cottage on the west shore of Sunapee Harbor. An avid outdoorsman, for many years in late spring, he walked 400 miles from home in Philadelphia to Sunapee and then back again in the fall.

In 1909, Herbert’s concern about clear cutting on Mt Sunapee and the loss of its old growth forest spurred him to begin a fund raising campaign to conserve the upper mountain slopes for future generations. In less than 2 years, Welsh had raised the funds to buy 656 acres and created the Sunapee Reservation in association with the Society for Protection of NH Forests (SPNHF), which in 1948 became Mt Sunapee State Park.

Herbert Welsh founded and led the Sunapee Chapter of SPNHF, a position he held for 20 years. In 1925, Dewey family land north of the Harbor was to be sold and logged.  Herbert mobilized the Sunapee Chapter to raise funds to conserve the land and with $2,000 voted by the Town of Sunapee, the Dewey Woods was purchased in 1928. These acres are part of the public lands managed by the Sunapee Conservation Commission.

This trail honors the memory of Herbert Welsh, Sunapee’s early leader in land conservation efforts.

Mindfulness in the Mountains: adventure and meditation

Lama Willa Miller, Springfield, NH., rock climbing in Rumney was part of a three-day adventure and meditation program, Mindfulness in the Mountains. Courtesy photo.

Mindfulness in the Mountains, a three-day adventure and meditation program, co-sponsored by Mountain Spirit Institute and the Natural Dharma Fellowship’s Wonderwell Refuge of Springfield N.H., wrapped up a weekend of rock climbing, kayaking and hiking in mid-October.

“I’ve been guiding and leading mountain programs for over 28 years, and this was, by far, one of the most fulfilling and meaningful experiences I’ve had,” MSI founder Randall Richards said. “To hike, climb or kayak and focus as a group on the quiet of the place, through which we traveled, was meaningful for both instructors and participants.”

A pair of instructors led each activity, one focused on outdoor skills, the other focused on teaching various meditation techniques, Richards said.

Eleven participants,  beginners and experienced hikers and kayakers, came from as far away as Florida and New York to hike, rock climb and kayak.

Activities were held in Dartmouth-Lake Sunapee region and in Rumney, N.H.

Wonderwell Refuge’s spiritual leader Lama Willa Miller said: “Buddhism actually has a strong wilderness tradition. Monks, spiritual teachers and meditation practitioners have always gone to the mountaintops and into nature to get a sense of the sacred.”

Participants signed up in advance for an activity, but were allowed to switch to a different sport and focus on the second day of the program.

Rock climbing tended to bring up fear and trust. Hikers focused on meditation in motion and awareness of surroundings and kayakers focused on the metaphor of sky and water in meditative contemplation.

Once back at the Wonderwell, participants came together for group meditation and to share their experiences.

Lama Miller rock climbed both days and said, of her experience: “In Buddhism, we have a meditation practice designed to help with facing one’s fear. Being forty feet up on the rock put’s it right in your face. It’s quite visceral.”

Said participant, Ilene Venizelos of Enfield, NH, “I feel this experience has helped me reconnect more with myself, to the other participants, and to especially to nature.”

MSI and Wonderwell Refuge plan to offer more collaborative programs.

Transition Town training to be held in New London, N.H.

New London, N.H. – Students in the Third Year environmental science/studies major at Colby-Sawyer College are helping to build the infrastructure for a Transition Town initiative in the Kearsarge Valley Region as a part of their Community-Based Research Project.

They are hosting a training event for the Kearsarge Valley area on the weekend of November 9th-11th, 2012. Any and all interested community members are welcome to attend the training that will be held on campus in the Curtis L. Ivey Science Center.

“If you love expanding your knowledge while connecting with other enthusiastic community members, then please join us for a weekend full of discovery, excitement, and strategizing,” the release says.

“Transition Initiatives” or “Transition Towns” bring together local networks of individuals, businesses and organizations that are committed to improving the well-being and resilience of their communities.  Drawing upon the ideas, skills and experiences of residents they develop positive localized solutions to discuss the regional impacts of larger global issues such as economic insecurity, environmental instabilities, and dependence on non-renewable energy.

To learn more about this event or to register,  visit www.kearsargetransition.wordpress.com or call Jillian Dervishian, 617-791-7910.

Tina Clarke and Simon Dennis, both Certified Transition Trainers, will facilitate this weekend event. Clarke has been an educator, advocate, director and consultant for nonprofit programs since 1985.  She has consulted with over 400 NGO’s and she has trained and advised over three dozen other Transition Initiatives.

Simon Dennis is one of the founders of Transition Town White River Junction, as well as the Center for Sustainable Practice, and has played key roles in organizing two successful community gardens.  He was also the co-founder and co-director of COVER Home Repair and the ReCover Store, a non-profit that works with volunteers to complete the community’s most urgently needed home repairs and sell donated building materials and household goods to support this mission.

This three-day course is an in-depth experiential introduction to the Transition Movement. Packed with imaginative and successful ways to engage your community, the course describes how to catalyze, build, and facilitate a successful Transition Initiative. It delves into the theory and practice of Transition that has worked well in hundreds of communities around the world.

Training Schedule:

  • Friday, Nov. 9th 5:30-9 p.m. Potluck Dinner & Discussion. Free and open to the public.
  • Saturday, Nov.10th 9:30-5:30 p.m.
  • Sunday, Dec.11th 12-5:30 p.m.

Number of participants is limited. Cost for the weekend: $90 – a few scholarships are available. For more info and to register, e-mail: transition.town@colby-sawyer.edu.

Wilderness Society’s Peter McKinley will speak at ASLPT meeting

The Ausbon Sargent Land Preservation Trust is putting an anniversary twist on all its events throughout this, its 25th anniversary year. Its annual business meeting will be special, as well. On Sunday, October 21 at 3 p.m, ASLPT will meet at the historic Center Meeting House in Newbury, N.H. and the business part of the meeting will be greatly abbreviated to allow for a special guest speaker from The Wilderness Society, Peter McKinley.

McKinley joined The Wilderness Society in 2010, having worked in northeastern conservation and ecological research for the last 20 years. He is the Climate Adaptation Ecologist for the Northeast Region and will have some interesting and timely information to share about the current trends in climate adaptation.

“The Center Meeting House can seat over 220 people and we are opening this event to the public,” the release says. “We all have concerns for the environment and how climate changes will effect our Mt Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee Region and Peter [McKinely] will share his expertise and experience which should appeal to all.”

  • Ausbon Sargent works to preserve the rural landscape of the Mt. Kearsarge/Lake Sunapee region. It now protects 120 properties totaling 9.742 acres in its 12 town service area. Visit: www.ausbonsargent.org
  • The Center Meeting House, after more than six years of meticulous restoration, serves the community as a center for activities that enrich the community. It is located on the corner of Routes 103 and 103A. Visit: www.centermeetinghouse.org
  • Since 1935, The Wilderness Society has led the effort to permanently protect nearly 110 million acres of wilderness in 44 states. Visit: www.wilderness.org
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